bluetooth

bluetooth - CS263: Wireless Communications and Sensor...

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© 2004 Matt Welsh – Harvard University 1 CS263: Wireless Communications and Sensor Networks Matt Welsh Lecture 6: Bluetooth and 802.15.4 October 12, 2004
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© 2004 Matt Welsh – Harvard University 2 Today's Lecture Bluetooth Standard for Personal Area Networks (PANs) IEEE 802.15.4 New standard for Low Power Wireless Networks
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© 2004 Matt Welsh – Harvard University 3 Bluetooth basics Short-range, high-data-rate wireless link for personal devices Originally intended to replace cables in a range of applications e.g., Phone headsets, PC/PDA synchronization, remote controls Operates in 2.4 GHz ISM band Same as 802.11 and 802.15.4! Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum across ~ 80 channels Somewhat bulky application interfaces Not just simple byte-stream data transmission Rather, complete protocol stack to support voice, data, video, file transfer, etc. Bluetooth operates at a higher level than 802.11 and 802.15.4
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© 2004 Matt Welsh – Harvard University 4 Bluetooth basics cont'd Maximum data rate of up to 720 Kbps But, requires large packets (> 300 bytes) Class 1: Up to 100mW (20 dBm) transmit power, ~100m range Class 1 requires that devices adjust transmit power dynamically to avoid interference with other devices Class 2: Up to 2.4 mW (4 dBm) transmit power Class 3: Up to 1 mW (0 dBm) transmit power Security is “optional” Many devices on the market do not take security seriously
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© 2004 Matt Welsh – Harvard University 5 Usage Models Wireless audio e.g., Wireless headset associated with a cell phone Requires guaranteed bandwidth between headset and base No need for packet retransmission in case of loss Cable replacement Replace physical serial cables with Bluetooth links Requires mapping of RS232 control signals to Bluetooth messages LAN access Allow wireless device to access a LAN through a Bluetooth connection Requires use of higher-level protocols on top of serial port (e.g., PPP) File transfer Transfer calendar information to/from PDA or cell phone Requires understanding of object format, naming scheme, etc. Lots of competing demands for one radio spec!
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© 2004 Matt Welsh – Harvard University 6 Protocol Architecture Physical Radio Spec Logical Link Control and Adaptation Protocol (L2CAP) Baseband Specification RFCOMM (Cable Replacement) PPP IP UDP/TCP Object Exchange Telephony Control Service Discovery Audio
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© 2004 Matt Welsh – Harvard University 7 Piconet Architecture One master and up to 7 slave devices in each Piconet : Master controls transmission schedule of all devices in the Piconet Time Division Multiple Access ( TDMA
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This note was uploaded on 02/25/2011 for the course CS 263 taught by Professor Welsh during the Fall '10 term at Syracuse.

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bluetooth - CS263: Wireless Communications and Sensor...

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