{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Individ Differences Phys Early Child

Individ Differences Phys Early Child - Developmental...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Developmental  Developmental  Psychology Psychology USC, Spring 2009 Jane E. Roberts, Ph.D. Individual Differences Temperament Physical & Perceptual Motor Development
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Emotional Self-Regulation Emotional Self-Regulation The process of initiating, inhibiting, or modulating  internal feeling states, emotion-related physiological  processes, and emotion-related cognitions or  behaviors in the service of accomplishing one’s goals Its emergence in childhood is a long, slow process
Background image of page 2
Patterns in  Patterns in  Developing Self-Regulation Developing Self-Regulation Transition from Regulation by Others to Self-Regulation Use of Cognitive Strategies to Control Negative Emotions Ability to Select Strategies Appropriate for the Situation
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Transition to Self-Regulation Transition to Self-Regulation In the first months of life, parents  help infants regulate their  emotional arousal by controlling  their exposure to stimulating events By 6 months, infants can reduce  their distress by averting their gaze  and sometimes by self-soothing,  which is engaging in stylized or  repetitive rubbing or stroking of  their bodies or clothing Between ages 1 and 2, infants  increasingly turn their attention to  non-distressing objects or people to  distract themselves from sources of  distress
Background image of page 4
Transition to Self-Regulation Transition to Self-Regulation Over the course of the early years, children  become more likely to rely on themselves rather than  their parents when they must delay gratification In addition, they become increasingly able to rely on  language to manage their emotional arousal and to  regulate their expression of negative emotions Children’s improving self-regulation is due at least in  part to the increasing maturation of the neurological  system They are also influenced by increases in adults’  expectations of children and to age-related  improvement in the ability to inhibit motor behavior
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Temperament Temperament The constitutionally based  individual differences in  emotional, motor, and  attentional reactivity and self- regulation that demonstrate  consistency across situations,  as well as relative stability over  time Differences in the various  aspects of children’s emotional  reactivity that emerge early in  life are labeled as dimensions  of temperament
Background image of page 6
Infant Temperament Infant Temperament Stella Chess and Alexander Thomas conducted pioneering  longitudinal research on infant temperament.  Three categories (based on parents’ reports):  Easy babies (40%):  Adjusted readily to new experiences,  quickly established routines, and generally were cheerful  in mood and easy to calm Difficult babies (10%):
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}