Module 24 - Intro to Memory

Module 24 - Intro to Memory - memory stem. Includes...

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Module 24: Introduction to Memory Memory: the persistence of learning over time through the storage and retrieval of information Flashbulb memory: a clear memory of an emotionally significant moment or event. Note: they are not always accurately recalled—e.g. President Bush wrongly recalling where he was when he “witnessed” 9/11. - Our memory is like a computer’s information-processing system: 1. Encode: get information into our brain 2. Storage: retain that information 3. Retrieval: get it back out later Atkinson-Shiffrin’s classic three-stage processing model of memory: Stage 1: Sensory memory – the immediate, very brief recording of sensory information in the memory system. Stage 2: Short-term memory – activated memory that holds a few items briefly (e.g. 7- digits of a phone number while dialing) before the info is stored or forgotten. Stage 3: Long-term memory – the relatively permanent and limitless storehouse of the
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Unformatted text preview: memory stem. Includes knowledge, skills, and experiences. *some info skips first two stages and is processed into long-term automatically unbeknownst to us. Working memory: a newer understanding of short-term memory that involves conscious, active processing of incoming auditory and visual-spatial info, and of info retrieved from long-term memory. *quickly fades unless we keep using/rehearsing it, we associate new and old info and solve problems. *also: includes auditory and visual-spatial elements, coordinated by a central executive processorthey allow us to process images and words simultaneously (e.g. talk while driving)-front lobe is active when central executive focuses on complex thinking-parietal and temporal lobe areas active when processing auditory and visual info...
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This note was uploaded on 02/26/2011 for the course PSYCH 101 taught by Professor Ennis during the Fall '09 term at Waterloo.

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