Alternatives to psychoanalysis-Jung and Adler

Alternatives to - Alternatives to psychoanalysis Jung and Adler 1 The Neo-Freudians and ego psychology Expanded the concept of the ego The ego was

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1 Alternatives to psychoanalysis: Jung and Adler
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2 The Neo-Freudians and ego psychology Expanded the concept of the ego The ego was seen to have a more extensive role, rather than being the servant of the id Ego can function independently of the id Less emphasis on biological forces as influences on personality. More credit was given to the impact of social and psychological forces Minimized the importance of infantile sexuality and the Oedipus complex, suggesting that personality development was determined primarily by psychosocial rather than psychosexual forces
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3 Carl Jung Analytical psychology Jung focused on inner growth instead of social relationships Freud’s theory is more concerned with interpersonal relationship (Jung had an isolated childhood, unlike Freud) Freud defined libido largely in sexual terms, Jung regarded it as a generalized life energy of which sex was only a part Basic libidinal energy expressed itself in growth, reproduction and other activities, depending on what was crucial for an individual at any given time
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4 Analytical psychology (cont’d) Freud described people as victims of childhood events; Jung believed we are shaped not only by the past but also by our goals, hopes, and aspirations Personality was not fully determined by experiences during the first 5 years of childhood but could be changed throughout one’s lifetime
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5 The unconscious Two levels of unconscious mind Personal and collective unconscious Personal unconscious contains experiences in a person’s life that have been suppressed or forgotten
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6 Collective unconscious The collective unconscious A level below the personal unconscious is the collective unconscious The deepest level of the psyche; it contains inherited experiences of human and prehuman species These universal, evolutionary experiences form the basis of personality
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7 Collective unconscious Archetypes Inherited tendencies within the collective unconscious that dispose a person to behave similarly to ancestors who confronted similar situation Common archetypes: persona, anima/animus, shadow, the self
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8 Collective unconscious Archetypes Persona is the mask each of us wears when we come in contact with other people We act as we think other people expect us to act in different situations Anima/animus reflect the idea that each person exhibits some of the characteristics of the other sex
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This note was uploaded on 02/26/2011 for the course PSYC 415 taught by Professor Ting during the Spring '10 term at Maryland.

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Alternatives to - Alternatives to psychoanalysis Jung and Adler 1 The Neo-Freudians and ego psychology Expanded the concept of the ego The ego was

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