Lecture 1 (course introduction)

Lecture 1 (course introduction) - Food-poisoning virus was...

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Food-poisoning virus was spread in football game By LINDA A. JOHNSON, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS College football players sick with food poisoning passed the virus to the opposing team on the field in the first documented case of its kind. The Duke University teammates vomited in the locker room and on the sidelines during the Sept. 19, 1998, game against Florida State after getting sick on a turkey lunch. Duke lost 62-13, but not before the virus crossed the line of scrimmage. “The only contact between the two teams was on the playing field,” said Dr. Christine Moe. “The virus was passed by people touching each other's contaminated hands, uniforms and maybe even the football itself.” Game films showed ill Duke players with vomit on their jerseys colliding with opponents, and Duke players wiping their mouthpieces on their hands, then touching opponents' faces and later shaking their hands. Researchers now urge coaches to bench players with such illnesses and stress the importance of handwashing when ill and after using the bathroom. The food- and waterborne virus, which is from a family called Norwalk-like viruses, causes vomiting, stomach cramps and diarrhea. The virus family causes an estimated 96 percent of cases of non-bacterial gastroenteritis, or inflammation of the stomach and intestines. It gets far less attention than food-borne bacteria such as E. coli because it causes no permanent damage and rarely kills. Person-to-person transmission sometimes occurs in crowded living situations, such as on cruise ships. But this is the first documented case of transmission among participants in a sports event. Altogether, 43 of the Duke players and staff members who ate contaminated turkey sandwiches got sick. They transmitted it to 11 other Duke personnel who had not eaten the sandwiches and to 11 Florida State players but no staff members. "It
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Teaching Team Instructors: Dr. Stein Dr. Smith TAs UTAs General Microbiology is designed to get you involved What you do in Lab, Lecture and ELMS are related to each other and to the understanding of microbiology and how microbiology is relevant and important If you have a question, comment, need help, ASK me, Dr Smith, your TA, your UTA, other students.
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1. Make us earn our salary 2. Don’t be afraid to ask questions 3. Take practice exams 2 days prior to exam 4. Come to lab with questions about lecture material 5. Review study guide questions 6. Memorize definitions of vocabulary words and realize that
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This note was uploaded on 02/28/2011 for the course BSCI 223 taught by Professor Stein during the Spring '08 term at Maryland.

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Lecture 1 (course introduction) - Food-poisoning virus was...

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