Steinlectue32011

Steinlectue32011 - Since searching for evidence of present...

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Unformatted text preview: Since searching for evidence of present or past life is a key objective, the sampling system carried on the rover must not contaminate the sample with any organisms brought from Earth. The coring apparatus must be thoroughly cleaned before launch so the samples won't interact with dust or biological material from Earth. After all, we wouldn't want to bring a sample all the way from Mars and study its features, only to discover that we're studying Earth materials along with it. We want "pure" Martian samples, straight from the source! Rovers and other space vehicles do a great job studying Mars. However, the most exhaustive studies of rock, soil, and atmospheric particles can only be conducted in laboratories here on Earth. After all, nothing beats the hands-on expertise of scientists. However, bringing samples back is challenging since it requires rockets that can ascend from the surface of Mars to orbit and may require vehicles that can rendezvous and capture the sample for delivery to Earth http://marsprogram.jpl.nasa.gov/missions/samplereturns.html Artists Concept - NASA Lecture 3 Architecture of Bacterial Cells Case 1: ELVIS Chapter 3 Lecture 4: Chapter 3 continues MARS Today’s lecture • Archaea and Bacteria are single cell prokaryotic organisms with distinct characteristics • All prokaryotes have a cell wall • The cell membrane is the cell barrier • The cell wall gives cells shape. • Peptidoglycan is unique to Bacteria, provides rigidity, and is a target for antimicrobial chemicals. • Bacteria can be differentiated into two groups by their cell wall type. • Gram-positive and Gram-negative cells can be revealed by the gram stain • Case 1 shows how microbiology is relevant to the Search for Life in the Universe NASA is 25% 25% 25% 25% • National Air and Space Association • National Aviation and Solar system Association • National Aeronautics and Space Administration • National Atmosphere and Space Administration 10 0 of 30 NASA Search of life in the Universe • How would you recognize life • How would you distinguish an extraterrestrial life form from an earthly life form?? Abstract: Space Programs will soon allow us to search for life in situ on Mars and to return samples for analysis. A Major focal point is to search for evidence of present or past life in these samples, evidence that, if found, would have far reaching consequences for both science and religion. A search strategy will consider the entire gamut of life on our own plane using that information to frame a search that would recognize life even if it were fundamentally different from that we know on earth. We discuss here how the lessons learned from the study of life on Earth can be used to allow us to develop a general strategy for the search for life in the Universe Since searching for evidence of present or past life is a key objective, the sampling system carried on the rover must not contaminate the sample with any organisms brought from Earth. contaminate the sample with any organisms brought from Earth....
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This note was uploaded on 02/28/2011 for the course BSCI 223 taught by Professor Stein during the Spring '08 term at Maryland.

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Steinlectue32011 - Since searching for evidence of present...

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