201 Class 8 Glass Menagerie

201 Class 8 Glass Menagerie - THTR 201 THEATRE APPRECIATION...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
THTR 201 – THEATRE APPRECIATION February 8, 2011 The Glass Menagerie
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Review from last class Can you answer the following questions? Who is Tennessee Williams? Why is he considered “famous”? What are his three best known plays? What are the identifying characteristics of his plays? What is meant by “Southern Gothic”?
Background image of page 2
Today’s Goals
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Tennessee Williams and The Glass Menagerie Why do I care about some old play first produced in 1944…wow, that’s 67 years ago! What could this play possibly have to say to me? The Glass Menagerie is a play about being trapped, about having no escape. Trapped by your family, trapped by your own fears, trapped by society and the economy…everyone feels trapped at one time or another… The Glass Menagerie reveals and examines these ideas – and allows us to answer the question “What scares me?” and “How would I escape if I was trapped?”
Background image of page 4
Let’s return to Chapter 3: How to Read a Play When we read a play, we first look at the following: Title Cast of Characters Opening Stage Directions First Reading Ending
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Let’s return to Chapter 3: How to Read a Play Title The Glass Menagerie Glass: a hard, usually transparent substance that shatters easily Menagerie: wild animal exhibit ( a collection of wild animals kept in captivity for the curiosity and entertainment of the public, sometimes as part of a traveling show ), OR a wild animal enclosure ( an enclosure in which wild animals are kept for public exhibition ), OR diverse or exotic group ( a diverse, exotic, or unusual group of people or things ) Why this title? What does it mean? To what or whom does the title refer?
Background image of page 6
Let’s return to Chapter 3: How to Read a Play Cast of Characters The Mother: Amanda Wingfield The Son: Tom Wingfield The Sister: Laura Wingfield The Gentleman-Caller: Jim O’Conner In the story of your life, what character(s) do you play? What are your roles? Are you satisfied with the role you play?
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Let’s return to Chapter 3: How to Read a Play Opening Stage Directions The Wingfield apartment is in the rear of the building, one of those vast hive-like conglomerations of cellular living-units that flower as warty growths in overcrowded urban centers of lower-middle-class population and are symptomatic of the impulse of this largest and fundamentally enslaved section of American society to avoid fluidity and differentiation and to exist and function as one interfused mass of automatism. The apartment faces an alley and is entered by a fire-escape, a structure whose name is a touch of accidental poetic truth, for all of these huge buildings are always burning with the slow and implacable fires of human desperation. The fire-escape is included in the set - that is, the landing of it and steps descending from it. The scene is memory and is therefore non-realistic. Memory takes
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 38

201 Class 8 Glass Menagerie - THTR 201 THEATRE APPRECIATION...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online