Chapter 8

Chapter 8 - o more convenient for early farmers because...

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Chapter 8- Apples or Indians Why did agriculture develop independently in some areas earlier than in other areas? - problems with the local people - problems with the local wild plants o very few wild plants are edible for humans - discussed which plants are native to what areas - 200,000 wild plants: a few 100 domesticated, around 12 provide 80% of the world’s food - various founder crops but only a few used o most don’t work because of seed size - competition between hunter-gatherer and sedentary lifestyles What are some advantages of the Fertile Crescent? - Mediterranean climate o Species could grow more rapidly and adapted best in that climate - Wild plants were already highly productive o When crops native to one area were brought to another area that didn’t already have them people would usually adapt and use them - Many plants pollinate themselves
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Unformatted text preview: o more convenient for early farmers because sometimes accidental new plants could be discovered -high diversity of wild plant and animal species o favored evolution of annual plants -wide range of altitudes in a small area o staggered harvest seasons meant hunter-gatherers could move along the mountainside instead of having to only have one main harvest season -domesticated mammals as well as plants o goat, sheep, pig, cow were domesticated early on in the Fertile Crescent -agriculture launched by early domestication of crops o cereals emmer wheat, einkorn wheat, barley, pulses lentil, pea, chickpea, bitter vetch, fiber crop flax -faced less competition from hunter-gatherer lifestyle o different crops o combination of factors would push hunter-gatherers to different lifestyle -...
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This note was uploaded on 02/28/2011 for the course HIST 038 taught by Professor Burns during the Fall '10 term at GWU.

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