AKC_Buddhism3

AKC_Buddhism3 - Meditative Schools Chan Buddhism in China...

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Meditative Schools Chan Buddhism in China (6 th c. CE) Zen Buddhism in Japan (7 th c. CE) Rinzai and Soto: most active sects Chan and Zen come from dyana Dhyana = meditation = seventh step of Noble Eightfold Path
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Bodhidharma (500 CE) Founder of Chan Buddhism Indian monk Shocked Chinese emperor Studying sacred Buddhist scriptures and building monasteries are worthless acts
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Bodhidharma, (Ming Dynasty 17 th c.)
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Chinese Monk Huike Cuts Off His Arm to Be Bodhidharma s Disciple! (Japan 15 th c.)
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Main Characteristics Goal = immediate insight or enlightenment such as Gautama achieved under the Bo-tree Salvation = private, personal experience Every individual has the nature of the Buddha Doctrine of shunyata (= emptiness – that is emptiness of any permanent individual essence)
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Method of Salvation dhyana in Sanskrit or meditation Salvation is actually obtained not by meditation BUT by insight or awakening (prajna in Sanskrit) following on meditation Reading, works, rituals are of little merit
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Enlightenment Sudden Brings an awareness of the unity of oneself with the universe There is no duality between oneself and the world, the Buddha and I All are the Buddha being In Japanese, satori = the Enlightened awareness
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Meditation techniques borrowed from Taoism (Chinese native religious and philosophical movement) Learners should stop distinguishing, separating, defining, analyzing, and describing
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Meditation Techniques Roshi = to break the grip of the rational mind seated meditation (zazen) word puzzles (koan) manual labor in kitchen and garden
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Transmission of Knowledge from master to disciple private sessions with a master
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Portrait sculpture of a Zen priest, 14th–15th century Japan
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Great Influence on Japanese Culture Code of behavior of the samurai warrior Serving of tea Reveals Tathata, the“thatness of life,” its unconditioned reality ink calligraphy and painting haiku poetry (short poem of three lines garden design flower arrangement
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Zen Paintings
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Gibbons
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Rationalist Schools Tian-tai in China (China in the 6 th c. CE) Tendai in Japan (8th-9th c. CE) # Meditative Schools Equal weight given to meditation and study Lotus Sutra In China, tried to reconcile Theravada and Mahayana paths In Japan, the Tendai school made Buddhism a Japanese religion
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Esoteric or Mystery schools Zhen-yan (“true word”) – China 8 th c. CE Shingon in Japanese (9th c. CE) by a monk named Kukai Kuka founded a monastic center at Mount Koya, near Osaka After death,was named Kobo Daishi – “the great Master who broadly spreads the Dharma” and is a venerated cultural hero in Japan)
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Shingon Ordination Screen: Hermit Composing Poetry, Japan, 11 th c.
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C L O S E U P
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Strongly mystical Possible to attain Buddha-hood in this life All phenomena of universe = manifestations
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This note was uploaded on 02/28/2011 for the course REL 100 taught by Professor Woodword during the Fall '08 term at ASU.

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AKC_Buddhism3 - Meditative Schools Chan Buddhism in China...

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