Groups and Teams Part 3recap brief version_1

Groups and Teams Part 3recap brief version_1 - Groups and...

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Unformatted text preview: Groups and Teams Groups Part 3 Purposes, Processes, Skills, Problems and a Few New Ideas Purposes Purposes Minimizing errors in organizations, teams and groups Improving efficiency, accuracy and predictability Integrative Processes Integrative Organizations, groups and teams are knowledge and information processing systems Forming new connections within the knowledge base Creativity Group skills essential to task performance Distinguish information from knowledge Knowledge depends on applying judgment, selecting, interpreting and sharing Knowledge Processors Systemic/Dynamic Determining purposes and roles Shared cognitive models Gathering data Agreeing on what constitutes knowledge and what to do with it All Knowledge is Incomplete All Responding to threats to decision making • • • Leading from a values orientation Establishing shared values Conflict resolution and group skills Threats to scanning the environment • Not recognizing what is important • Not recognizing who should participate What constitutes knowledge and how is it produced? Deciding where to seek information • member resources • member networks Decisions about relevance • shared mental model of the task • sources available to the group Interpretation and evaluation • negotiated mental models • accessing knowledge and expertise Ethical Rules of Exchange Equality Respect Openness Surfacing and addressing interests Trust: Trust: The Objective of Team Skills Creation and Maintenance Emotional Cognitive • Loyalty • Confidence Behavioral • Understanding • Expectations • Reliance • Openness Organizations, Groups and Teams Teams Objective: Effectiveness, Process and Building Ethical Engagement Group Skills Group Transportable Competencies Conflict resolution Collaborative problem solving Communication Adaptive skills Goal setting Planning and task coordination Performance management Senge: Learning Organizations A set of values An approach to best practices Minimizing effects of member rank Keeping knowledge and expertise “in motion” Group Learning Group Requires group skills Integrates fragmented task skills, knowledge and information Continual improvement in • • • • Interacting Detecting and correcting errors Exploiting opportunities Performance and results Triggers to Group Learning Triggers Pressures • • Opportunities Deadlines, limited resources Internal pressures Readiness to learn • Members’ capabilities, morale, personality traits, networks • Openness to new ideas Skills Acquisition Skills Phase One New group formed Task specific skills learned Behavioral norms established Roles and tasks assigned Team Mental Model forms Motivation Phase Two Phase Progress assessment Team strategy review Review assumptions and motivations Phase Three Phase Focus on task Maintain internal communication Lessons learned Network Connections and Processes The map is not the territory External and boundary spanning networks Resources Resources Koslowski, S. and Bell, B. 2008. “Team learning development and adaptation.” In Sessa, V. and London, M., Eds., (pp. 15­144), Work Group Learning: Understanding, improving and assessing how groups learn in organizations. NY, NY: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Pritchard, S. and Ashleigh, M. 2007. “The effects of team­skills training on transactive memory and performance.” Small Group Research, 38/6. Senge, P. 2006. The Fifth Discipline : The art and practice of the learning organization. New York : Doubleday/Currency. Sessa, V. and London, M. 2008. “Group learning: An introduction.” In Sessa, V. and London, M., (Eds). (pp. 3­13), Work Group Learning: Understanding, improving and assessing how groups learn in organizations. NY, NY: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Silberstang, J. and Diamante, T. 2008. “Phased and targeted interventions: Improving team learning and performance. In Sessa, V. and London, M., Eds., (pp. 15­144), Work Group Learning: Understanding, improving and assessing how groups learn in organizations. NY, NY: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Wegner, D. 1987. “Transactive memory: A contemporary analysis of group mind.” In B. Mullen and G. R. Goethals, (Eds). 1986. Theories of Group Behavior (pp. 185­208) New York, NY: Springer­Verlag ...
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This note was uploaded on 02/28/2011 for the course COM 230 taught by Professor ? during the Spring '06 term at ASU.

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