Chapter 10- Intellectual Property and Internet Law

Chapter 10- Intellectual Property and Internet Law -...

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Chapter 10- Intellectual Property and Internet Law T RUE -F ALSE  Q UESTIONS         1. To receive a patent, an applicant must show that an invention is genuine, novel, useful, and not obvious  in light of current technology.         2. To obtain a copyright, an author must show that a work is genuine, novel, useful, and not a copy of a  current copyrighted work.         3. In determining whether the use of a copyrighted work is infringement under the fair use doctrine, one  factor is the effect of that use on the market for the copyrighted work.         4. A personal name is protected under trademark law if it acquires a secondary meaning.         5. A formula for a chemical compound is not a trade secret.         6. A trade name, like a trademark, can be registered with the federal government.         7. A copy must be exactly the same as an original work to infringe on its copyright.        
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This note was uploaded on 02/27/2011 for the course ACCT 2050 taught by Professor None during the Spring '11 term at Algoma University.

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Chapter 10- Intellectual Property and Internet Law -...

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