Lect3_2011slides - Lecture 3 Protein Folding, Degradation...

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Lecture 3 Protein Folding, Degradation ***OPTIONAL READING: review articles*** Goldberg, Elledge & Harper. (2001) The Cellular Chamber of Doom. Scientific American 284 :68-73. Mukhopadhyay & Riezman. (2007) Proteasome-Independent Functions of Ubiquitin in Endocytosis and Signaling. Science 325:201-205 Sowa & Harper. (2006) From Loops to Chains: Unraveling the Mysteries of Polyubiquitin Chains Specificity and Processivity. ACS Chem. Biol. 1:20-24 Downloadable @ blackboard
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The folding of a protein is controlled by its amino acid sequence Alberts, 3-5 Some proteins fold on their own Most proteins need help to fold
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Few proteins can refold after complete denaturation. Alberts, 3-6
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Most proteins begin to fold as they are synthesized Alberts, 6-84
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David Goodsell’s Cell Art http://mgl.scripps.edu/people/goodsell/illustration/patterson Cells have special proteins called Chaperones to help the correct folding of proteins. Some Chaperones are highly specialized to their
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Lect3_2011slides - Lecture 3 Protein Folding, Degradation...

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