105Lecture%202 - LECTURE2:THE CHALLENGEOF THRASYMACHUS...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
LECTURE 2: THE  CHALLENGE OF  THRASYMACHUS January 24, 2011
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
REMINDERS Bring your iclicker and register it online at  iclicker.com. Large lecture etiquette: I ask you to not use a laptop: it  distracts me to see people watching their computer  screen (surfing the web) and not paying attention in  class. The lectures will all be on our Compass website. Attendance and participation will be recorded in both  large lecture and discussion section. Late registration is excused You fail the course if you miss half or more of the  lectures and discussion sections. Sign in sheet for lost, forgotten, broken iclickers. 
Background image of page 2
FOR WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY Wednesday: Plato’s  Republic : Book 2: Pages  36-40 (357a to 362c line 6), 45-56 (367a line 5 to  376c line 6) Friday: Film clip from the movie “Groundhog’s  Day”
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
BACKGROUND TO THE  REPUBLIC The Republic  is written by Plato and it  is a  dialogue  between Socrates and  several other people. Socrates is more or less the voice of Plato, so  we can say “Plato believes…” when it is  Socrates (the character) who says it.  Socrates was a real historical figure who  was sentenced to death by majority vote of a  jury of 500 Athenian citizens.  He was Plato’s teacher. The  Republic  was written in 380 BC
Background image of page 4
OVERALL CONCLUSIONS The Greek word for JUSTICE ( dikaiosynē ) comes from the  word “ dikē .” Dike was the daughter of Zeus who helped him  govern. The original meaning of justice was a set of instructions or laws  on how to live, which human beings have been given by the Gods  that separated them from mere animals. Those instructions are  those that enable an orderly, harmonious social existence. Telos  or the natural end/goal of a thing was how the law was given  to all things: all things have a form/essence that prescribes what  is best for them.   The dialogue is intended to lead us to the following  conclusions: 1. Justice is manifested in the person  with a “harmony of soul” in which  reason rules over the emotions and  desires. 2.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 17

105Lecture%202 - LECTURE2:THE CHALLENGEOF THRASYMACHUS...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online