105Lecture%203 - Lecture3: Lecture3: Glaucons...

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Lecture 3:  Lecture 3:  Glaucon’s  Glaucon’s  Challenge and the  Challenge and the  Ideal City Ideal City January 26, 2011
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Reminders Reminders Bring your iclicker and register it online at iclicker.com Attendance and participation is recorded in both large  lecture and discussion section. o Late registration is excused. Go to our Compass website for syllabus, schedule, etc. I will continue to repeat (until enrollment stabilizes) that I  ask you not to use laptops and other such devices during  large lecture.
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For Friday and Monday For Friday and Monday For Friday, watch the clips from “Groundhog’s Day” https://netfiles.uiuc.edu/rukgaber/www/ For Monday, Plato’s  Republic  Pages 96-102 (412b line 8  – 417b line 7 [end of Book 3]), 103-121, (419a-434d line  1)
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Review Review First, Thrasymachus argues that “justice” (our basic norms of right and wrong) are  just inventions by the rulers for their own advantage. o Under pressure of the objections that 1) rulers do not always invent norms to  their own advantage and 2) that rulers do not always make rules for their own  advantage, Thrasymachus changes his position. Second, Thrasymachus argues that “justice” (now understood generally as “how one  ought to live” or “what is good”) is “the advantage of the stronger,” meaning that the  way one ought to live is striving for one’s own advantage, being stronger than  everyone else, and doing whatever one wants. o This means that “justice” (our basic norms of right and wrong) are stupidity for  the strong and protections for the weak. In response to the idea that we ought to live to be stronger and more dominant over  others, Plato argues that such a way of life resembles stupidity. o Only stupid people fail to recognize the norms and facts within a domain of  knowledge that constitute excellence in that domain. o For example, excellence in medicine is striving towards the perfection in that  field, not striving to be stronger than everyone.
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Three Types of “Good” Three Types of “Good” Book II begins with Glaucon taking up Thrasymachus’  position for the sake of argument (he does not really  believe that Thrasymachus is correct). Glaucon makes the following distinction: 1. Things can be good for their own sake: o “The harmless pleasures from which nothing results  afterward beyond enjoying them.” Like the experience of  beauty. 2. Things can be good only for the consequences:
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This note was uploaded on 02/27/2011 for the course PHIL 105 taught by Professor Ruckgarber during the Spring '10 term at University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign.

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105Lecture%203 - Lecture3: Lecture3: Glaucons...

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