Ethics - Euthanasia.pdf - Is it morally acceptable to ask...

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Is it morally acceptable to ask for the right to die? Few countries in the world have legalized euthanasia and assisted suicide. Euthanasia is a practice of causing, by or under the control of a doctor, the death of an individual. It must be differentiated from the assisted suicide because it is not the same thing: assisted suicide is only intended to provide the means necessary for a person to give himself/herself the death that he/she deserves. Thus, euthanasia leads to passionate debates in countries that are tempted by legalization. Belgium, the Netherlands, Canada, and some American states have taken the plunge and allowed the practice in a strictly defined framework. A lot of questions are asked regarding this subject. Should we recognize men's right to die, in a burst of ultimate freedom, or should we limit ourselves to heal, help, accompany, and surround the most vulnerable people, those who soon will be dead no matter what? The question that I am going to center my attention on today is the following: is it morally acceptable to ask for the right to die? In other words, is it ethical to let people die even if they can be saved? To answer this question, I am going to focus first on the arguments in favor of euthanasia. After that, I will discuss the arguments against euthanasia, and finally, I will explain the state of euthanasia in the world. The primary argument for euthanasia is that every individual must be the sole decision maker of the rights associated with his body. He must be the only master of his life. A patient must be free of his body and his mind. It is, therefore, he who must be able to decide his life or his death. He must also be able to choose a dignified death that would be desired and decided by himself. He could, therefore, choose to stop the care to keep him alive or delay his death.
Then, euthanasia can allow a patient to avoid sufferings. In the event of serious and incurable illness, that patient may suffers atrociously and experiences a real nightmare. Sometimes, he asks to die to free himself from his troubles, because death is seen as a deliverance as life has become unbearable. This is where euthanasia can come in. "Death, a fight lost in advance" explains the American surgeon Atul Gawande in his book "Being Mortal". The author discusses the

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