2010-02-16 (9)

2010-02-16 (9) - TodaysOverview Review TwoModeNetworks...

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Today’s Overview Review Construction Two-Mode Networks Analysis
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Review of Thursday’s Quiz Define the following terms  (as they are relevant to this class) : 1. Degree 2. Homophily 3. Transitivity
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How do Networks Form? Random Used primarily as a statistical “control” Homophily contact between similar people occurs at a higher rate  than among dissimilar people (McPherson et al 2001, p.  416)  Transitivity
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Segregation Index – Freeman (1972) asked how we could identify segregation in  a social network.   Theoretically, he argues, if a given attribute (group label) does  not matter for social relations, then relations should be distributed  randomly  with  respect to the attribute.  Thus, the difference between the number of cross-group  ties expected by chance and the number observed measures segregation.   A    B    A    B                     A    B    A    B                   Observed Expected ) ( ) ( X E X X E Seg - =
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Sociology 36
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Sociology Psychology FHD Other CLAS Communications IDST  SBS – undeclared Business Herberger Public Policy Other 20 20 20 50 40 40 70 70 14.5 25.5 25.5 44.5 40 40 70 70 E(X) = R*C/T E(X) AA   = 40*40/110 =14.5
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20 20 40 40 70 70 25.5 25.5 40 40 70 70 E(X)  = (25.5+25.5)     X   = (20+20) Seg  = 51-40/ 51 = 11/ 51 = 0.22
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Observed 36 0 0 36 0 35 0 35 0 0 29 29 36 35 29 Expected 13 13 10 36 13 12 10 35 10 10 9 29 36 35 29 A E(X)  = (13+10)      X   = (0+0) Seg  = 23-0/ 23 = 23/ 23 = 1.0 ) ( ) ( X E X X E Seg - =
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Observed 13 13 10 36 13 12 10 35 10 10 9 29 36 35 29 Expected 13 13 10 36 13 12 10 35 10 10 9 29 36 35 29 B E(X)  = (13+10)      X   = (13+10) Seg  = 23-23/ 23 = 0/ 23 = 0.0 ) ( ) ( X E X X E Seg - =
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How do Networks Form? Random Used primarily as a statistical “control” Homophily contact between similar people occurs at a higher rate  than among dissimilar people (McPherson et al 2001, p.  416) 
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This note was uploaded on 03/01/2011 for the course SOC 294 taught by Professor Reesing during the Spring '08 term at ASU.

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2010-02-16 (9) - TodaysOverview Review TwoModeNetworks...

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