Despelder8_ppt_ch03

Despelder8_ppt_ch03 - u Chapter ThreeC h Chapter h Picture...

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Unformatted text preview: u Chapter ThreeC h Chapter h Picture 9 Perspectives on Death Cultural and Historical Cultural Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Cultural Sensitivity s s s s Avoid stereotyping Beware of judging the worth of other Beware communities communities Understand that culture is not defined Understand simply by ethnicity simply Know that there may be more Know differences within than between within between cultural groups cultural Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Ethnocentrism s Making judgments about others based Making solely on one’s own cultural assumptions and biases assumptions Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Death in Early and Traditional Cultures s s s s Origin of death Causes of death Power of the dead Names of the dead Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Origin of Death s s s s Transgression Testing Omission Action Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Causes of Death s s Supernatural Psychosocial Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Death and Dying in Western Culture s s s s Deathbed scene Burial customs Danse macabre / Dance of death Invisible death Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Burial Customs s s s s s s Graveyards Charnel houses Simple grave markers Effigies Rural cemeteries Ornate monuments Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Danse Macabre / Dance of Death s s s s Influenced by mass plague deaths Reflected inevitability and Reflected impartiality of death impartiality Emphasized uncertainties of human Emphasized mortality mortality Images and icons remain today Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Cultural Case Studies s s s s s Native American traditions African traditions Mexican traditions Asian traditions Celtic Traditions Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Native American Traditions s s s s s Diversity in beliefs and customs Death viewed as natural event “It’s a good day to die!” Death songs as final act of earthly life Reverence for bones of ancestral dead Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Native American Traditions s s s s Ohlone Cherokee Cocopa Hopi Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Ohlone s s s s Ensured progress of deceased to Ensured supernatural realm supernatural Adorn the corpse Personal possessions burned with Personal corpse corpse Name of deceased not mentioned for Name six months to a year six Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Cherokee: Multi-soul Concept s s s s Soul of conscious life leaves body at Soul death death 2nd soul, located in liver, takes about 2nd a week to die week 3rd soul, located in heart, takes about 3rd a month to die month 4th soul, located in bones, takes about 4th a year to die year Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Cocopa s s s s Wail in ecstasy of violent grief Wail behavior behavior Possessions burned with the body for Possessions use in afterlife use Ceremony held to mourn and Ceremony commemorate commemorate Invite spirits to join them in ritual Invite celebration celebration Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Hopi s s s Funeral rituals private and attended by Funeral few people few Mourners reticent about expressing Mourners grief grief Wish to avoid the dead completely Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright African Traditions s s s s s s Respect for ancestors Communion with “living dead” Age grouping Anonymous dead “Soul stuff” Attitude toward death essentially Attitude positive positive Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright LoDagaa of Northern Ghana: Mourning Practices s s s Funeral ceremonies span from six Funeral months to several years months Mourning companions “Mourning restraints” based on Mourning relationship to deceased relationship x Leather x Fabric x String Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Mexico: El Día de los Muertos s s s s s Communion between living and dead Fiesta-like atmosphere in cemetery Special foods (e.g., bread in shape of Special human bones) human Sugar-candy skulls and coffins Graves cleaned and decorated Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Chinese Traditions s s s s Specific mourning garments Use of fêng-shui in positioning the Use corpse corpse Ch’ing Ming festival celebrates return Ch’ing of the dead of Burn paper offerings Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Japanese Traditions s s s s O-bon festival reveres the souls of the O-bon dead dead Light used to guide the spirits Funeral prayers help emancipate the Funeral spirit spirit Dead given special name to indicate Dead their status their Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Japanese Traditions (continued) s s Butsudan (home altar) used for Butsudan remembrance and honor remembrance Dead cremated and entombed in the Dead haka (family gravesite) haka Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Celtic Traditions s s s Reverence for nature Struggle for survival in challenging Struggle environment environment Everything alive, inhabited by soul or Everything spirit, which can be helpful or harmful spirit, Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Celtic Traditions (continued) s s s Death on battlefield considered Death glorious glorious Fallen heroes welcomed into Valhalla, Fallen Valhalla, a place of heavenly honor place Dead heroes and warriors viewed as Dead source of power and inspiration source Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Celtic Traditions (continued) s s s The realm of the dead not a static The place place Death viewed as but a changing of Death place place Exchange of souls between this world Exchange and the Otherworld and Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Celtic Traditions (continued) s s Contact between living and dead Contact especially possible during festival of Samhain (November 1), a precursor of Samhain Halloween Halloween Priestly Druids acted as intermediaries Priestly Druids between world of the living and the supernatural world of the dead supernatural Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Celtic Traditions (continued) s Celts among the earliest to develop Celts belief in personal mortality belief Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Hawaii: Assimilation and Accommodation in Death Rites s s s s Local identity Pidgin as shared language Mortuaries set up to address needs of Mortuaries varied religions varied Rising proportion of hapa or mixedRising hapa race families Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Rediscovering the Commemoration of Death s s s s Shared experiences Sense of community Ritual and ceremony define and Ritual celebrate relationships between living and dead and Traditional insights and present needs Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright ...
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This note was uploaded on 03/02/2011 for the course SOC 353 taught by Professor Ibrahimnaim during the Spring '11 term at ASU.

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