Despelder8_ppt_ch10

Despelder8_ppt_ch10 - Chapter TenC ˆ Chapter Death in the...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Chapter TenC ˆ Chapter Death in the Lives of Children and Adolescents Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Early Childhood Death Experience s s s s s Change experienced as “little death” Distinction between animate and Distinction inanimate: “No more!” inanimate: Protothanatic behavior Death-related thoughts expressed in Death-related play activities, songs, and questions play Evolving understanding of death Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Life-Threatening Illness s s s s s Child’s perception of illness and Child’s medical care medical Child’s coping mechanisms Family members as caregivers Hospice and home-based palliative Hospice care care Accepting reality that a child is dying Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Children as Survivors of a Close Death s s s s s Death of a pet Death of a parent Death of a sibling Death of other relatives Death of a friend Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Bereaved Child’s Experience of Grief s Reflects influence of x Age x Stage of mental and emotional development x Patterns of family interaction and communication x Previous experience with death Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Death of a Pet s s Attachments between humans and Attachments animals can be strong animals Mourning death of a pet may be Mourning ridiculed by others as an “overreaction” “overreaction” Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Death of a Pet (continued) s s Grief should be acknowledged and Grief expressed expressed Allow time to mourn the loss before Allow acquiring a new pet acquiring Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Death of a Parent s s Loss of security, nurture, and Loss affection affection Memories, feelings, and actions may Memories, be used to construct an “inner representation” to sustain relationship with the deceased parent with Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Death of a Parent (continued) s Meaning of the loss is renegotiated Meaning over time over Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Death of a Sibling s s May increase sense of vulnerability to May death death May be the loss of a protector as well May as a playmate as Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Death of a Sibling (continued) s s May shatter trust in a benign, May benevolent universe benevolent May raise questions about the May meaning of life and death meaning Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Discussing Death with Children s s s Before a crisis occurs When a family member is seriously ill In the aftermath of a loss Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Helping Children Cope with Loss s s s s Don’t put off discussing death Consider child’s developmental Consider understanding understanding Keep explanation simple Distinguish fact from fancy (i.e., Distinguish metaphors) metaphors) Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Helping Children Cope with Loss (continued) s s s Answer questions honestly and Answer directly directly Verify what the child has understood Verify Listen to and accept reality of child’s Listen experience experience Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Helping Children Cope with Loss (continued) s s Books and stories are tools for coping Books and discussion and Support from a well-trained group Support leader or other professional can be valuable. Do not assume that all not licensed professionals have specialized training Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Helping Children Cope with Loss (continued) s s s Children are usually resilient in Children coping with change and loss coping Reassure child that he or she is loved “Healthy children will not fear life if Healthy their parents have the integrity not to fear death” (Erikson) fear Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright ...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 03/02/2011 for the course SOC 353 taught by Professor Ibrahimnaim during the Spring '11 term at ASU.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online