Despelder8_ppt_ch13

Despelder8_ppt_ch13 - Chapter ThirteenC Ð Chapter Threats...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter ThirteenC Ð Chapter Threats of Horrendous Death Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Risks of Death s s s All life involves risk Degree of risk often subject to our Degree own choices own Some risks identified only after years Some of exposure to hazardous condition of Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Risks of Death (continued) s s Individuals relate to risk-taking in Individuals different ways different Survivors may “blame the victim” as a Survivors way to cope with risky activities way Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Domains of Risk s s s s s Recreational and occupational Recreational activities activities Accidents and disasters Violence, homicide, terrorism War and the nuclear threat AIDS and other emerging diseases Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Risks: Recreational and Occupational Activities s s s Activities in pursuit of the “good life” Thrill-seeking sometimes involves Thrill-seeking attempts to deny death or the fear of death death Minimizing risk requires Minimizing acknowledging threat and taking steps to compensate to Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Accidents s s Viewing accidents as chance events Viewing reduces the possibility of preventing their occurrence their Carelessness, ignorance, and lack of Carelessness, awareness often play a role in causing accidents accidents Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Accidents (continued) s s Unsafe environmental conditions Unsafe contribute to accidents contribute Individuals and societies can Individuals minimize the risk of accidents minimize Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Violence s s s Interpersonal violence is a public Interpersonal health problem health Young people are disproportionately Young represented among victims of violence represented Children who witness violence are Children emotionally affected even when physically unharmed physically Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Violence (continued) s s The most threatening of violent acts The are those that occur without apparent cause, with the victim selected seemingly at random seemingly The use of violence to achieve The personal or political goals is found worldwide worldwide Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Violence (continued) s s s Factors favoring violence Psychic maneuvers Guidelines for lessening the potential Guidelines for violence for Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright War s s Killing in war involves a different set Killing of conventions and rules than those in civilian contexts civilian In modern times, chivalrous notions of In combat have been replaced by mass technological warfare technological Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright War (continued) s s Technological alienation leads to Technological psychic numbing psychic Genocide occurred with horrendous Genocide results in the twentieth century results Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright War (continued) s s Warfare is mind- and personalityaltering for the combatants As survivors, veterans of combat may As experience traumatic memories and other stress-related symptoms other Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright War (continued) s s s War creates a “phantom army” of War relatives and friends whose lives are disrupted disrupted Losses experienced in war need to be Losses grieved and mourned grieved The Vietnam Veterans Memorial is a The focal point for coping with the grief of personal as well as national loss personal Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright War (continued) s s s Nuclear weapons create the potential Nuclear for an encounter with death of unprecedented proportions unprecedented The presence of nuclear weapons The shapes our lives in both subtle and dramatic ways dramatic In recent history, few areas of the In world have escaped the impact of war world Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Terrorism s s s Involves use or threat of violence to Involves create a mood of fear among both its direct victims and a wider audience direct Aims to destroy the sense of security Aims people normally feel in familiar places people Modern terrorism—A synthesis of Modern war and theater war Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright The Impact of Terrorism: Variables s s Scope and extent of physical and Scope emotional devastation emotional Realization that destruction and horror Realization was intentional and directed not just at individuals but also at the government and culture they represent and Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright The Impact of Terrorism: Variables (continued) s s s Age of victims, especially when many Age are young adults or children are Defenselessness of the victims and Defenselessness suddenness of attack suddenness Duration of the event, including Duration rescue and recovery period rescue Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright The Impact of Terrorism: Variables (continued) s s s Difficulties and delays in identifying Difficulties and returning remains of victims and Issues related to disposition of Issues “common” or unassociated human tissue tissue Issues related to remains of terrorists Issues mixing with remains of victims mixing Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright The Impact of Terrorism: Variables (continued) s s s Intrusiveness of media coverage, Intrusiveness especially repetitive broadcast of disturbing visual images disturbing Speculation about perpetrators and Speculation their motivations their Speculations about whether the true Speculations architects of the terrorism can be apprehended and brought to justice apprehended Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright The Impact of Terrorism: Variables (continued) s s Speculation about the ability of Speculation official agencies to have prevented the attack and resulting loss of faith in government to protect its citizens government Large-scale memorials and Large-scale anniversary commemorations anniversary Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright The Impact of Terrorism: Variables (continued) s Difficulty in finding human service Difficulty providers and mental health professionals who have knowledge and experience in working with violent injury and death, as well as the ability to handle the disturbing and gruesome content of victims’ experiences experiences Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright AIDS and Other Emerging Diseases s s s First cases of AIDS reported in 1981 Main epicenters have been U.S. and Main sub-Saharan Africa sub-Saharan The political and social response to The AIDS has been mixed AIDS Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright AIDS and Other Emerging Diseases (continued) s s Despite therapeutic advances, the Despite AIDS epidemic is not over AIDS Emerging and re-emerging diseases Emerging remain threatening (e.g., Ebola, TB) remain Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Coping with Risks s s s Risks of various kinds confront us in Risks daily life daily “Horrendous death” typically has its Horrendous origins in human activity origins Reducing horrendous deaths requires Reducing confronting the desire to deny their reality reality Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Coping with Risks (continued) s Survival of societies as well as Survival individual requires finding adequate means of coping with risks means Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright ...
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This note was uploaded on 03/02/2011 for the course SOC 353 taught by Professor Ibrahimnaim during the Spring '11 term at ASU.

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