Despelder8_ppt_ch15

Despelder8_ppt_ch15 - e Chapter FifteenC l Chapter r The...

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Unformatted text preview: e Chapter FifteenC l Chapter r The Path Ahead Personal and Social Choices Personal Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland The Meanings of Death s s In our complex relationship with In death, we are both survivors and experiencers experiencers Death may be viewed as a threat or as Death a catalyst provoking greater awareness and creativity and Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Meanings of Death (continued) s Death may be viewed as the end to Death even the best of human accomplishments or as a welcome relief from life’s sufferings relief Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright The Value of Exploring Death and Dying s s s Awakens us to the preciousness of life Awakens and our relationships with others and Helps us come to terms with our own Helps finiteness and mortality finiteness Offers hope in the face of the Offers recognition that the world often seems chaotic and unpredictable chaotic Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright The Value of Exploring Death and Dying (continued) s s Allows new choices not based on fear, Allows denial, and mutual pretense denial, Provides opportunities to express and Provides resolve unsettling experiences of loss and grief and Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright The Value of Exploring Death and Dying (continued) s Fosters knowledge and insights that Fosters help us face dying and death more intelligently, both as individuals and as a society as Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright New Directions in Thanatology s s s s Bridging research and practice Clarifying the goals of death Clarifying education education Gaining International Perspective Creating compassionate cities Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright New Directions in Thanatology s s As a relatively new discipline, the As goals and curricula of thanatology continue to be refined continue The interplay between theory and The application must be considered in constructing an adequate knowledge base base Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright New Directions in Thanatology (continued) s s Understanding cultural diversity is Understanding crucial for both scholars and practitioners practitioners Lessons concerning our encounter Lessons with dying, death, and bereavement must be integrated into communities and public institutions and Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright New Directions in Thanatology (continued) s The global dimensions of death -- for The example, war, violence, terrorism, and environmental catastrophe -- must be part of a conceptual framework that focuses on the reality of death to help improve the quality of civilized life improve Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Bridging Research and Practice s s s Is there a cultural split between Is research and practice? research Do counselors and caregivers know, Do understand, and use newer research as well as test new theories? A “scholarship of action” is needed “scholarship wherein lies a dynamic exchange between research and practice. between Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Creating Compassionate Cities (Kellehear) s s s Meets special needs of the aged, Meets afflicted and bereaved afflicted Has strong commitment to social and Has cultural differences cultural Offers access to wide variety of Offers supportive experiences supportive Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Creating Compassionate Cities (Kellehear continued) s s s Promotes and celebrates reconciliation Promotes with indigenous peoples with Recognizes and plans to assist the Recognizes economically disadvantaged economically Preserves and promotes spiritual Preserves traditions and storytellers traditions Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Death in the Future s s What effect will aging populations What have on care of the dying? have How will the pace of social change How and daily life influence rituals and ceremonies surrounding the dead? ceremonies Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Death in the Future (continued) s s How might environmental concerns How affect traditional methods of disposing of the dead? of What kinds of innovations in social What support services will be created to offer resources for the dying and bereaved? bereaved? Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Death in the Future (continued) s s What unforeseen medical What technologies might become commonplace for sustaining life? commonplace If currently life-threatening diseases If are prevented or treated routinely, what will threaten survival? what Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Death in the Future (continued) s How will the nature of ethical issues How regarding dying, death, and bereavement evolve over time? bereavement Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Living with Death and Dying s Death is an event whose significance Death ripples outward to touch the lives not only of loved ones and friends, but also the lives of acquaintances and even strangers even Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Living with Death and Dying (continued) s A casual attitude toward death, an casual attitude that aims to achieve “death without regrets,” may mask a subtle denial of death’s reality denial Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Living with Death and Dying (continued) s Death need not be seen only as Death something foreign to our nature, a foe to be vanquished or fought to the bitter end bitter Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Living with Death and Dying (continued) s There is no single definition of what There constitutes a good death; more useful, good perhaps, is the concept of an appropriate death appropriate Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Living with Death and Dying (continued) s Cultural values and social context Cultural influence our ideas about the qualities that make a death appropriate for a particular person particular Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Living with Death and Dying (continued) s To achieve an appropriate death for To ourselves, or to help others achieve such a death, we must abandon the notion that death is never appropriate never Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Principles of a Good Death s s s s To know that death is coming and to To understand what can be expected understand To be able to retain reasonable control To over what happens over To be afforded dignity To have adequate relief of pain and To other symptoms other Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Principles of a Good Death (continued) s s s To have choice about where death To occurs (home or elsewhere) occurs To have access to information and To expertise of whatever kind is needed expertise To have access to desired spiritual and To emotional support emotional Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Principles of a Good Death (continued) s s s To have access to hospice or palliative To care care To have a say about who is present To and who shares the end and To be able to make advance directives To that ensure wishes are respected that Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright Principles of a Good Death (continued) s s To have time to say goodbye To be able to die when it is time and To not have life prolonged pointlessly not Copyright © 2009 Lynne Ann DeSpelder and Albert Lee Strickland Copyright ...
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This note was uploaded on 03/02/2011 for the course SOC 353 taught by Professor Ibrahimnaim during the Spring '11 term at ASU.

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