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Bio. 203 Lecture 2 RSA 1-25-08

Bio. 203 Lecture 2 RSA 1-25-08 - Inheritance For a long...

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For a long time, general ideas of inheritance were known ie. cows give birth to cows, not horses brown dogs usually gave birth to brown dogs What was really lacking was a quantitative understanding of how particular traits were passed down to their offspring Inheritance
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The small monastery garden used by Mendel
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Choice of Pea as Model System Mendel chose garden pea as his model Why? Easy to grow Can be crossbred artificially Grows to maturity in one season. Easily identifiable visible features, Each with two contrasting traits. True-breeding strains.
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Mendel's Experiments Used pure-breeding lines of garden peas Examined crosses involving seven different characters
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Monohybrid Crosses Monohybrid crosses involve a single pair of contrasting traits. The original parents are the P1 generation. Offspring are the F1 generation. Offspring arising from the self-fertilizing of F1 generation are the F2 generation.
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Monohybrid Cross In the F1 generation of a monohybrid cross, all of the plants have just one of the two contrasting traits. In the F2 generation, 3/4 of the plants exhibit the same trait as the F1 generation, and 1/4 exhibit the contrasting trait that disappeared in the F1 generation
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The Monohybrid Cross Reveals How One Trait Is Transmitted from Generation to Generation
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Principle of Segregation Mendel’s monohybrid crosses were not sex dependent. It did not matter whether, say, a tall male plant pollinated a dwarf female plant, or vice versa. The results were the same either way. This is called a reciprocal cross. This 3:1 ratio occurs in later generations as well.
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