Roach1 manual

Roach1 manual - PSYC 401 LAB MANUAL! LAB 3 - ROACH BEHAVIOR...

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PSYC 401 LAB MANUAL LAB 3 - ROACH BEHAVIOR PAGE 1 Core Questions What is a good strategy to avoid capture by an attacking predator? How do animals detect wind? How do you design an experiment measuring directional behavior? How can you analyze directional data? How does the CNS determine the direction to a stimulus source? What is the personality of a cockroach? Directional Escape Survival depends on knowing a predator’s location WHAT ARE WE GOING TO DO? You will use behavioral arena experiments to determine what direction a cockroach runs relative to a ‘predator’ that generates wind when it attacks. You will then use ablation experiments to discover what organs detect wind and whether both of them are required to tell where a predator is. Web resources: Basic cockroach info with lots of links Cockroach FAQ Cockroach-inspired technology Consciousness in a cockroach Many want to eat, few want to be eaten. Studying the strategies prey use to escape from predators has provided rich insights into the design of sensory systems. Essential to successful escape are directional information (Where is the threat?) and speed. Normally the CNS compares the input from two sensors like eyes or ears to pinpoint the location. Speed is the result of minimal processing time, high conduction velocities, and optimal design of limb and muscle.
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PSYC 401 LAB MANUAL LAB 3 - ROACH BEHAVIOR PAGE 2 THE BASIS OF DIRECTIONALITY Cockroaches are very talented at escaping from danger, and wind generated by an approaching predator the major stimulus. The wind-sensitive hairs ( sensilla ) on the cerci at the tip of the abdomen are exquisitely sensitive. This is possible because they are very long and thin (Fliform) and they attach to the cuticle through a ball- and-socket joint ( socketed hair ). Each hair responds preferentially to wind from a different direction. The left and right cerci point away from the midline, so they will experience wind coming from the same direction quite differently. ±or instance, ipsilateral wind will be a much stronger stimulus than wind coming from the other side. You can easily see the sockets of these hairs on the body of a mantis. Filiform hairs like those on cockroach cerci are very much longer and thinner than these.
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PSYC 401 LAB MANUAL LAB 3 - ROACH BEHAVIOR PAGE 3 Invertebrate Model Systems Why would anyone interested in the nervous system of primates, i.e. us, want to do experiments with cockroaches and crayFsh? The term ‘model system’ refers to an experimental animal (cockroach, mouse, sea slug, fruit ±y) or type of experiment (tissue slice recording) that, for practical reasons, provides an exceptional opportunity to understand basic concepts applicable to a broad range of animals. Model systems are typically much simpler to work with in some important respects than most other possibilities. Invertebrates are attractive to neuroscientists because
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Roach1 manual - PSYC 401 LAB MANUAL! LAB 3 - ROACH BEHAVIOR...

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