Alternative Modes of Clinical Intervention Chap9

Alternative Modes of Clinical Intervention Chap9 -...

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Alternative Modes of Clinical Intervention Chapter 9
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Group Therapy Proliferation of group and family therapy reflects evolving view that a person’s behavior is “a reflection of the relationship systems [it] inhabits” (Kramer, 2009) Group therapy was first practiced in the early 20 th century but increased during shortage of therapists that developed after WWII All major theoretical orientations have some form of group therapy; to varying degrees, each focuses on the importance of interpersonal relationships
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Therapeutic Factors in Group Therapy Multiple clients are served at once, getting feedback from the group leader (therapist) and other group members (clients) Sharing New Information : group leader and other members offer advice and share their experiences; feedback from multiple sources can have a bigger impact Instilling Hope : Group members provide hope to fellow clients that positive change is possible Universality : Group members learn that they are not alone, that their problems are not unique Altruism : Group members get positive “feelings of self worth” by helping others Interpersonal Learning : Group is a safe place to get feedback on nonverbal behaviors and to practice interpersonal/social skills Group Cohesiveness : Members of cohesive groups feel secure enough to allow for expression of negative emotions with a place to then repair damaged relationships; cohesiveness is thought to be the most important factor of effective group therapy
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Usually consist of 6 to 12 clients and 1 or 2 therapists Homogeneous groups, in which group members are the same sex, age group, presenting problem, allow direct focus on a common problem Heterogeneous groups are easier to form, although group members are generally homogeneous with 1 or more important aspects such as presenting problem or shared goals CBT, or psychoeducational, groups focus on learning and sharing
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Alternative Modes of Clinical Intervention Chap9 -...

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