Basic Features of Clinical Assessment Chap3

Basic Features of Clinical Assessment Chap3 - Chapter 3...

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Chapter 3 Basic Features of Clinical Assessment
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Receive and clarify the referral questions Plan data Collection Procedures Collect Assessment data Process data And form conclusions Communicate Assessment results See figure 3.1 p. 74
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The Assessment Process Assessment is “the collection and synthesis of information to reach a judgment” Referral source is the person or entity requesting the evaluation This is important during the “communicate results” stage Referral question is the issue to be addressed in the assessment Psychologists use clinical judgment and experience to help the referral source clarify the referral question Examples
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Assessment Data Interviews Behavioral observations Psychological tests Use well-validated tests that measure relevant information Case history data Why use multiple asst. sources? Can’t rely on self-report; gain other, more objective, perspectives
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What to do with the data Decide what the data mean Must use clinical experience and context Often, test manuals can help interpret scores Report results An assessment is useless without a report Communicate clearly to your audience (avoid jargon)
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Common goals of clinical assessment Accurate diagnosis—also called diagnostic classification, psycho diagnosis, differential diagnosis Important for proper treatment Research on causes of disorders requires accurate labeling Treatment Planning—what should we do next and how well is it working? Prognosis—a prediction regarding the outcome of treatment Often a goal of forensic evaluation is prediction of dangerousness to self or others. This is very difficult; most tend to over predict dangerousness because the cost of being wrong is so high
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Multiaxial Diagnosis He’s depressed vs. Note the improved understanding of this client. DSM-IV-TR was developed empirically Includes V-codes which are descriptive but not covered by insurance Axis II disorders are less reliably diagnosed Axis I: Major Depressive Disorder, recurrent, severe, with atypical features Axis II: Dependent Personality Disorder Axis III: Chronic kidney disease requiring dialysis Axis IV: undereducated, underemployed, problems connecting with peer group Axis V: GAF (current) = 40
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Categorical vs Dimensional Diagnosis Categorical pros: Convenient short-hand for psychologists Helps steer towards intervention Simplify disorders that have many phenomenological presentations Categorical Cons: Some clients misdiagnosed Does not appreciate subclinical impairment— overuse of NOS Co-morbidity clouds research Dimensional Pros: Co-morbidity is common with anxiety, depression, substance abuse, and
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This note was uploaded on 03/01/2011 for the course PSYC 436 taught by Professor Dr.andrealeiman during the Spring '10 term at Maryland.

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Basic Features of Clinical Assessment Chap3 - Chapter 3...

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