Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Psychotherapies Chap8

Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Psychotherapies Chap8 -...

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Behavioral and Cognitive- Behavioral Psychotherapies Chapter 8
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Behavior Therapy There is no single method that is behavior therapy Many techniques are classified as such Relaxation training, systematic desensitization, exposure therapies, biofeedback, assertiveness A key assumption to behavioral therapy is that “the behaviors seen in psychological problems develop through the same laws of learning that influence the development of other behaviors”
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Conditioning Classical Conditioning —a neutral stimulus is paired with another stimulus that automatically triggers a reflexive response Classically conditioned responses develop quickly and can become phobias Operant Conditioning —Specific behaviors are strengthened (or weakened) by rewards (or punishments) that follow One example is avoidance behaviors which can generalize over time Vicarious Conditioning (observational learning)— when people develop behaviors by watching others
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Assessment in Behavioral Therapy This special kind of assessment is called functional analysis, which examines: (Table 8.1, p. 271) Stimulus—antecedent conditions and environmental triggers that elicit behavior Organism—Internal physiological responses, emotions, and cognitions Response—Overt behavior engaged in by the person Consequences—What happens as a result of the behavior Behavioral Psychologists will also use structured interviews, objective psychological tests and behavior rating forms (self and other report)
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Goals of Behavior Therapy Therapists seek to help clients modify maladaptive behaviors and the accompanying emotions, cognitions, and physical responses, so the client can replace these with more positive/healthy behaviors Therapist plays role of educator and empathetic collaborator In contrast to humanistic therapist, the behaviorist sees the therapist-client relationship as the context in which specific techniques can create change
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Features of Behavior Therapy Focus is on specific problems A thorough assessment is required for each client Therapists help clients by facilitating changes in behavior Sought after behavior changes are planned carefully with the therapist to maximize chances of success Therapists help clients generalize positive behavioral changes
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Clinical Techniques Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR)—involves teaching the client to sequentially tense and then relax muscle groups; goals is to lower overall arousal level; helpful for Generalized Anxiety Disorder
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This note was uploaded on 03/01/2011 for the course PSYC 436 taught by Professor Dr.andrealeiman during the Spring '10 term at Maryland.

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Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Psychotherapies Chap8 -...

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