Clinical Child Psychology Chap11

Clinical Child Psychology Chap11 - Clinical Child...

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Clinical Child Psychology Chapter 11
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Exam 2 Grade Distribution 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 A+ A A- B+ B B- C+ C C- D+ D D- F
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History of Clinical Child Psychology For much of the 20 th century, child-specific problems were overlooked; “a downward extension and extrapolation from the study of psychopathology in adults” This means the unique aspects of psychopathology in children was overlooked DSM-IV first included disorders “specific to infants, children, and adolescents” such as learning disorders, feeding disorders, and disruptive behavior disorders
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History of Clinical Child Psychology (cont) New journals focusing on children/adolescents Started appearing and APA societies were developed These were indicators that the field of clinical psychology was paying attention to the unique aspects of child problems Why now after over ½ a century of neglect? Psychopathology is common in childhood—14-22% of children are diagnosed with a behavioral emotional or learning disorder Many childhood disorders such as Asperser's and learning disorders have life-long consequences Nearly all adult disorders stem from childhood disorders, many of which have not been diagnosed or treated (one study found that fewer than 15% of children with a diagnosable psychiatric disorder had received treatment in the last year) Research can lead to early intervention and hopefully, prevention
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Unique aspects of Clinical Child Psychology Referral —Children depend on an adult in their lives to refer them for help Confidentiality —Legally parents “own” their minor children’s information, so therapists must set rules regarding privacy In some states, like MD, if a parent agrees to certain levels of privacy, this is legally binding Context of Behavior —Children have limited, if any, control over their environment such as school, home, diet, activities, dress, and therapists must recognize this when planning treatment
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Unique aspects of Clinical Child Psychology (cont) Developmental Issues—How appropriate or inappropriate a behavior is depends heavily on child’s age and culture; most symptoms of childhood disorders are seen at some point, so developmental level must be considered by the evaluator Fears, bedwetting, disobedience, concentration problems, body image, & alcohol use vary by age and developmental level
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Most psychologists see parent-child interactions as bidirectional , meaning they influence one another Patterson’s coercion-escalation hypothesis of aggressive behavior (1969) In both aggressive an nonaggressive homes, the child’s behavior influences the probability of certain parental responses and the parent’s behavior alters the probability of certain responses from the child Aggressive children were 2x more likely to continue their aversive behavior even after parental punishment
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Clinical Child Psychology Chap11 - Clinical Child...

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