Forensic Psychology Chap14

Forensic Psychology Chap14 - Forensic Psychology Chapter 14...

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Forensic Psychology Chapter 14
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Definition and Scope Forensic Psychology—”the application of mental health knowledge and expertise to the assessment and treatment of individuals” involved with the legal system Tasks include: Determining if a person is mentally ill and/or dangerous enough to warrant involuntary hospitalization Deciding if a person is mentally competent to stand trial Determining if a perpetrator was sane at the time of the crime Deciding if a person suffered psychological harm as the result of an injury, trauma, or event Making recommendations regarding child custody and adult guardianship To complete the above tasks, forensic psychologists offer their opinions at civil and criminal trials and depositions/hearings
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Definition and Scope (continued) Law Enforcement Psychology—involves research on agencies and also direct clinical services to employees of law enforcement agencies Also can be involved in candidate selection; providing consultation to officers about the probable nature of the perpetrator(s); and questioning witnesses Psychology of Litigation—focuses on the effects of trial procedures So, psychologists might consult attorneys regarding jury selection or study the effect on verdicts of having expert witnesses Correctional Psychology—Concerns the psychological treatment of incarcerated persons or those on probation or parole
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Criminal Competence and Responsibility Mental Illness and Insanity are not the same; sanity is a legal concept determined by the court, not by a psychologist In most states, expert witnesses cannot give an opinion about whether a person is sane or insane When a defendant’s mental status is called into question at trial two
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This note was uploaded on 03/01/2011 for the course PSYC 436 taught by Professor Dr.andrealeiman during the Spring '10 term at Maryland.

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Forensic Psychology Chap14 - Forensic Psychology Chapter 14...

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