Interviewing and Observation Chap4

Interviewing and Observation Chap4 - Interviewing and...

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Interviewing and Observation Chapter 4
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Intake interviews Interviews (a conversation with a purpose or goal) and observations are “most widely employed tools in clinical psychology” (Kramer et al., 2009) The course of treatment depends heavily on the relationship developed during the interview Can get samples of verbal and nonverbal behavior (see Table 4.1, p. 118) Intake Interviews—find the nature of the problem About 50% of clients who attend the intake interview don’t come back for treatment This % can be increased by warmth rather than cold professionalism
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Types of Interviews Problem-Referral—Used to answer a referral question. Is Mr. X mentally ill? Can Mrs. X care for herself? Orientation Interview—Used to provide psycho- Very important in treatment and research to prevent attrition Termination/Debriefing Interviews—Used to lower anxiety, discuss future, and/or reveal any deception used in research Crisis Interviews—Used to collect information rapidly in an emergency
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Cultural Issues Members of minority races & cultures receive less mental health care than the general population Also, mood and anxiety disorders are less often diagnosed in African-American and Hispanic children Research suggests this is due to clinician biases Clinicans need to be aware of cultural differences in the expression of distress For example, it is more acceptable for persons from Asian cultures to express psychological symptoms in the form of somatic distress Clinicans must get educated about the populations they work with and consult frequently with colleagues
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Interview Structure Amount of structure depends on theoretical orientation and personal preference
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This note was uploaded on 03/01/2011 for the course PSYC 436 taught by Professor Dr.andrealeiman during the Spring '10 term at Maryland.

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Interviewing and Observation Chap4 - Interviewing and...

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