Research on Clinical Intervention Chap10

Research on Clinical Intervention Chap10 - Research on...

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Research on Clinical Intervention Chapter 10
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Evaluating Psychotherapy The question of “is psychotherapy effective” is too broad to answer accurately…much better is “what treatment, by whom, is most effective for this individual with that specific problem, under which set of circumstances, and how does it come about” (Paul, 1969) Kazdin (1982) proposed the following research goals: Determine the efficacy of a specific treatment Compare relative effectiveness of different treatments Assess the specific components of treatment that are responsible for particular changes
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Evaluating Psychotherapy (cont) Kazdin’s research goals have been expanded to include: Assessment of durability of treatments Identification of negative side effects Determine how various clients accept certain treatments (or not) Evaluate cost effectiveness of treatment Decide if treatment effects are clinically significant and socially meaningful
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Evaluating Psychotherapy (cont) The controlled experiment is the best option for determining the cause-effect relationship between therapy and outcome Manipulated factors are called independent variables (usually the type of therapy) and measures factors are called dependent variables (amount of client change)
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Within-Subjects Research Designs Dependent variables are measured several times First measurement is a baseline, taken at pre-treatment The intervention begins and measurements of the dependent variable are taken Different types are ABAB and multiple-baseline designs. Examples, see pp 334-335 The latter is preferred when there are clinical or ethical concerns about stopping treatment
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Between-Subjects Designs In a group of clients, the therapy is given to one set of clients ( experimental group ) and no therapy ( control group ) is given to the other set Measures of the problematic behavior or symptom are taken at the end of the study (posttest) and at a point in the future (follow-up) To reduce error, clients are randomly assigned to groups
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This note was uploaded on 03/01/2011 for the course PSYC 436 taught by Professor Dr.andrealeiman during the Spring '10 term at Maryland.

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Research on Clinical Intervention Chap10 - Research on...

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