Guidelines for ASL

Guidelines for ASL - Thirteen Guidelines To Launch Yourself...

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1/06 T hirteen Guidelines To Launch Yourself Into ASL ASL and English are two distinct languages. These guidelines can help you get started on your road to learning ASL. Use them as a guide, not rules. As with all languages, there is flexibility in ASL. You will learn when to apply these guidelines appropriately as you progress through your ASL courses. These guidelines do not apply to all situations. You will discover many exceptions. Your instructor is the best source for clarification of any misunderstandings. Examples are given in English and written ASL (known as “gloss”). ASL does not have a true written form. The written ASL (gloss) shown does not indicate the facial grammar (expression) that is absolutely necessary to sign each statement correctly. All ASL must be executed with the corresponding facial expressions. The written ASL here is only meant to provide you with enough of an example to understand each guideline’s concept. 1.
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Guidelines for ASL - Thirteen Guidelines To Launch Yourself...

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