regionaldialects

Regionaldialects - REGIONAL AND SOCIAL DIALECTS by Don L F Nilsen 42 1 SETTLEMENT OF AMERICA 1 NEW ENGLAND NAMES New England Plymouth Rock New York

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42 1 REGIONAL AND SOCIAL DIALECTS by Don L. F. Nilsen
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42 2 SETTLEMENT OF AMERICA # 1: NEW ENGLAND NAMES New England Plymouth Rock New York New Jersey Cambridge, Massachusetts Boston Celtics (Irish) New Amsterdam (Dutch) Harlem New York Knickerbockers Dutch West Indies
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42 3 EASTERN U.S. DIALECTS (Marckwardt and Dillard 280)
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42 4 SETTLEMENT OF AMERICA # 2: PENNSYLVANIA NAMES William Penn Pennsylvania Dutch (Deutch) “thee” “thy,” “thine” and “thou”
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42 5 SETTLEMENT OF AMERICA # 2: SOUTHERN NAMES IN DELMARVIA Jamestown, Virginia Williamsburg, Virginia The Slave Trade: Charleston, South Carolina; Liverpool, England; and Sierra Leon, West Africa Pidgins and Creoles resulting from “Maritime English”) The development of black English as a pidgin
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42 6 SETTLEMENT OF AMERICA # 3: THE CUMBERLAND PASS Scottish and Irish settlements in the South Irish story tellers (the Jack tales like “Jack and the Beanstalk”)
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42 7 NORTHERN, MIDLAND & SOUTHERN EXPANSION WESTWARD (Shuy 294)
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42 8 PHONOLOGICAL DIFFERENCES Greasy With spoon (noon) Creek Roof However, wash is not so much regional as rural.
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42 9 PHONOGICAL DISTINCTIONS THAT ARE BECOMING LOST cot-caught witch-which mourning – morning However, pin-pen is remaining stable. (Fromkin Rodman Hyams 413)
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42 10 NEW ENGLAND PHONOLOGY lot (New England) park the car; Cuba-r-is merry – marry – Mary calf (pass, path, dance) Brooklyn: dis, dat, dese, dose, dem
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42 11 The Southern Dialect “The South, because of its rural, isolated past, boasts a diversity of dialects, from Appalachian twangs in several states, to Elizabethan lilts in Virginia, to Cajun accents in Louisiana, to African- influenced Gullah accents on the coasts of Georgia and South Carolina.” “One accent that has been all but wiped out is the slow juleps-in-the-moonlight drawl favored by Hollywood portrayals of the South. To find that so- called plantation accent in most parts of the region nowadays requires a trip to the video store.” (Collins & Wyatt [2009]: 333-334)
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42 12 The Plantation Drawl vs. Appalachian Speech “Even as the stereotypical southern accent gets rarer, other speech patterns take its place, and they’re not any less southern.” “The Upland South accent, a faster-paced dialect native to the Appalachian mountains, is said to be spreading just as fast as the plantation drawl disappears.” (Collins & Wyatt [2009]: 334)
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42 13 Walt Wolfram on Southern Speech Walt Wolfram says that “the vowel shift where one-syllable words like “air” come out in two syllables, “ay-ah” is certainly vanishing.” “Other aspects—such as double-modal constructions like “might could”—are still pervasive.” (Collins & Wyatt [2009]: 335)
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42 14 Roy Blount Jr. on Southern Speech Roy Blount Jr. said, “My father, who was a surely intelligent man, would say ‘cain’t,’
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This note was uploaded on 03/01/2011 for the course ENG 312 taught by Professor Nilsen during the Spring '10 term at ASU.

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Regionaldialects - REGIONAL AND SOCIAL DIALECTS by Don L F Nilsen 42 1 SETTLEMENT OF AMERICA 1 NEW ENGLAND NAMES New England Plymouth Rock New York

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