Chapter7CRTests

Chapter7CRTests - Chapter 7 Constructed-Response Tests...

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Chapter 7 Constructed-Response Tests
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Constructed-Response Tests Any time you ask your students to respond in other than a selected-response manner, you are asking students to construct a product or display a behavior in a constructed-response manner. Fill-in-the-blank items Short-answer items Essay items (restricted and extended response items) ---AND--- Performance assessments Portfolios Speeches Presentations, etc. ..
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Constructed-response items elicit responses more closely related to the kinds of behavior students must display in real life. After students leave school, the demands of daily life almost never require them to choose responses from 3-4 alternatives. Constructed-response items are much more difficult than selected-response items to answer and to score. When classroom teachers choose constructed-response tests, they must be willing to trade some scoring accuracy for better information about the student Constructed-Response Tests
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Short-Answer Items Short-answer items call for students to supply a word, a phrase, or a sentence in response to either a direct question or an incomplete statement. Short-answer items are suitable for assessing simple kinds of learning outcomes such as students’ acquisition of knowledge. Short-answer items are the most simple form of constructed-response items.
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Short-Answer Items Strength Students need to produce a correct answer, not merely recognize it from a set of selected- response options. Weakness Students’ responses are difficult to score. The longer the responses sought, the tougher they are to score. Inaccurate scoring leads to reduced reliability.
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Short-Answer Item Construction FILL-IN-THE-BLANK: Use direct questions more often than incomplete sentences The use of direct questions forces less ambiguity. The use of direct questions is better for younger children. Insert point values per question Make sure the point values match the number of blanks to be filled. E.g. If you ask students to name the two components of H2O and provide two blanks for them to answer hydrogen and oxygen, the point value should = 2 points. If all questions = 2 blanks then (2 points each) If each question has a different number of blanks, place the point values after each respective question You can also tell students each blank = 1 point. Order the questions by point value If you have 5 fill-in-the-blank questions, Qs 1, 2, and 3 each have one blank (1 pt.), so they should come before Q4 which has 2 blanks and Q5 which has 3 blanks Position blanks Place the blank(s) immediately after the question. For incomplete sentences, place the blank(s) near the end of the sentence, not the
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This note was uploaded on 03/01/2011 for the course TEL 314 taught by Professor O'niell during the Fall '10 term at ASU.

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Chapter7CRTests - Chapter 7 Constructed-Response Tests...

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