Lecture 1 Ch1 - Welcome to Anthropology 1Z03E: The Human...

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Welcome to Anthropology 1Z03E: The Human Species: Becoming and Being Human Instructor: Scott Martin Email: swmart@mcmaster.ca
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My Main Archaeological Interests: - spread of maize (corn) into the Lower Great Lakes region (as early as 300 BC in New York) - Ontario’s archaeological past (esp. Middle Woodland (c. 400 BC-AD 500) to Late Woodland (c. AD 500/800-1650) - early Irish prehistory (Mesolithic and Early Neolithic) - themes: tradition, transmission and transition - ancient technology (esp. stone tools) - ancient plant remains (archaeobotany)
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Textbook: Clark Spencer Larsen’s (2008) Our Origins: Discovering Physical Anthropology -Glossary for terms near the back (definitions also in margins in the chapters) -Big Questions boxes with answers at the ends of the chapters. -Appendix – The Skeleton -Area for notes at the very back -One area that it lacks in, perhaps, is the discussion of Holocene Hunter-Gatherers (anatomically modern people who were not farmers or at least not full-time farmers). No ‘big events’ noted from 1 mya to 10,000 ya!?
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Here’s an introduction to some of the questions we’ll be able to answer by the end of the course…
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What is physical anthropology?
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Vedbaek , near Copenhagen, Denmark (c. 4000 BC) stone knife snail shells and deer teeth swan’s wing What happens to bodies after death?
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How does evolution work? Charles Darwin
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How does heredity work?
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What causes evolutionary change? Peppered moth – industrial melanism camouflage Melanistic Eastern Gray Squirrel - Adaptive melanism for heat absorption?
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Who are our closest living relatives?
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Who are our closest non-living relatives?
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How do anthropologists study the past? Tollund Man, Jutland, Denmark - 4 th century BC - Pre-Roman Iron Age
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Why become a primate?
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How did we become hominids?
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Who were the earliest members of the genus Homo ?
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How has our behaviour and environment affected our biology? Black Death – note bird mask to prevent inhalation and spread Women grinding cereals (c. 9000-6500 BC) at Abu Hureyra, Syria – chronic, occupational degenerative joint injuries
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How are humans different? How do we study human growth, development and variation?
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