Lecture 8 - Lecture 8: Stone Tools and Stone Tool...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 8: Stone Tools and Stone Tool Production Waste (aka debitage) (together: lithics) stone artefacts = lithics esp. made into tools such as: projectile points (including: dart heads, spear heads and arrow heads) also scrapers, as-needed cutting tools, axes, adzes, mortars and pestles etc., mill stones structural remains Some Terms: projectile points (arrow heads, but can be spear heads or dart heads) bifaces versus unifaces blades, bladelets and microliths (from prepared cores) flakes fragments left over from stone tool manufacture (sometimes can be utilised expediently for their sharp edge), the edges of these can be retouched knappers those who fashion stone by chipping Raw stone/lithic materials that people can use to make stone tools : chert, chalcedony, flint, jasper, hornstone, agate, quartzite etc. chert found in limestone/dolomite parent rock chemical reactions and pressure serve to make the bodies of ancient sea animals (e.g. shellfish) and the sand in sea-floor sediments into glass-like material known as cryptocrystalline silicates (kinds of quartz) The end product is rounded nodules and tabular layers of this flinty stone. This material can be broken more or less predictably by humans in the process called flintknapping. Ancaster/Goat Island/Lockport Onondaga Selkirk/Dundee Haldimand/Bois Blanc Fossil Hill/Collingwood Kettle Point Bayport Flint Ridge/Vanport Burlington (Missouri and Illinois) Upper Mercer/Coshocton Hardyston jasper Selected Chert types in the Lower Great Lakes Pipe Creek Age of Mammals age of apes age of humanity Geological Time Scale Geological Time Scale 395mya 430mya 500mya There are two main ways of producing flakes from blocks or cobbles of chert or flint: direct percussion and indirect percussion ....
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This note was uploaded on 03/01/2011 for the course ANTHRO 1A03 taught by Professor Eveningclass during the Spring '08 term at McMaster University.

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Lecture 8 - Lecture 8: Stone Tools and Stone Tool...

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