Com 350 Film Analysis of Hairspray

Com 350 Film Analysis of Hairspray - Film Analysis of John...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Film Analysis of John Water’s Hairspray By Bonnie McAvoy Com 350: American Cinema Dr. Kim Walker April 21, 2009
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
John Water’s or the “Sultan of Sleaze” as some might no him by finally creates a PG rated film! Hairspray is strikingly different from his other films such as the underground gross-out epics, Pink Flamingos (1972), Female Trouble (1975), and Desperate Living (1977); all proving to be controversial and infested with bad-taste. Water’s was so proud of those types of films; he even gave himself the name “Prince of Puke.” 1 Hairspray comparatively proves to be a delight and it was Water’s first leap toward mainstream. Water’s wrote and directed Hairspray with a budget of 2.6 million dollar (a lot money than his previous films) 2 . Water explains that Hairspray is “a satire of the two most dreaded film genres today- the ‘teen flick’ and the ‘message movie.’” Satirical or not, Hairspray is a pop comedy that rejuvenates both genres, taking us back to the 60’s with its’ mise-en-sc`ene. Hairspray
Background image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/28/2011 for the course COMM 203 taught by Professor Stansburry during the Spring '07 term at University of Colorado-Colorado Springs.

Page1 / 2

Com 350 Film Analysis of Hairspray - Film Analysis of John...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online