EuthanasiaHandout09

EuthanasiaHandout09 - Direct vs. Indirect Passive...

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Religion 261 Euthanasia (eu-thanatos) Principle of Double Effect (a slightly different definition from last time) You may not do something intrinsically wrong ( malum in se ) to bring about a good effect (eg., murder to prevent other murders) but what would be wrong if you did it directly may be tolerated as a nonmoral evil, if 1) it is the unintended and secondary effect of a good and morally permissible action, not willed as an end or used as a means (“indirectly voluntary”) 2) you have a proportionately grave reason (“morally worth its compensation”) 3) you try to minimize the bad effect even to the risk of self (cf. Michael Walzer) Ethical Issues Voluntary (Patient’s Choice), Non-Voluntary (Unable to Choose), and Involuntary Voluntary, Physician-Assisted Suicide : Active Euthanasia (active means to bring about someone’s death, like through lethal injection)
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Unformatted text preview: Direct vs. Indirect Passive Euthanasia (letting die, omitting or withdrawing what would otherwise preserve life, refusing to intervene) Ordinary vs. Extraordinary Contested Values: Autonomy and Relationality Mercy and Compassion The nature and meaning of suffering Distribution of Resources and Priorities, Medical Futility Negative and Positive Rights Slippery Slope Ethical theories: Kantian, Utilitiarian, Virtue, Christian Principle of Double Effect Religious Issues Life as a gift (Meilander) and yet not a “second God” (Barth/Cahill) The culture of death and learning to die Legal Issues Legality vs. Morality (a distinction identified in both Liberalism and Christianity) The “pedagogical” function of the law? Legalizing what is immoral? Making illegal what may be moral?...
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This note was uploaded on 02/28/2011 for the course REL 261 taught by Professor Erics.gregory during the Fall '09 term at Princeton.

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