Chapter 16 (I)

Chapter 16 (I) - Chapter 16 The Heat Capacity of Solids...

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Chapter 16 The Heat Capacity of Solids In this chapter, we shall apply statistical methods to obtain the heat capacity (C v ) of solids, or more precisely, the heat capacity associated with the lattice vibrations of crystalline solids. In general, there are other contributions to heat capacity of solids. For example, in metals there is a contribution from the conduction electrons, which will be treated in Chapter 19. We shall only consider the vibrational heat capacity in this Chapter. 16.1 Introductory remarks
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There are two basic experimental facts about the C v of solids that any theory must explain: (1) Near room temperature, C v 3Nk=3R for most solids. This is essentially the law of Dulong and Petit (1819). (2) At low temperatures, C v 0 as T 0. The fact (1) can be explained by the classical statistical mechanics with the principle of equipartition of energy: every atom of the solid can be treated as 3 linear oscillators and thus have six degrees of freedom, so U=(f/2)NkT=3NkT, and
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This note was uploaded on 02/28/2011 for the course PHYS 359 taught by Professor Dr.asdas during the Winter '10 term at Waterloo.

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Chapter 16 (I) - Chapter 16 The Heat Capacity of Solids...

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