Finalpaper - CRJ 110 Internet INTRODUCTION TO LAW...

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CRJ 110 Internet INTRODUCTION TO LAW ENFORCEMENT CONCEPT PAPER Terry Crew November 4, 2007 Instructor: Dena Martin
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The Early, Political, Reform and Community Policing Eras of American history are vastly different from each other, with different details and aspects that are rarely similar. It is important for any police officer or respectable citizen to be informed of these events, in order to learn from the past, to make those mistakes made then not something that occurs in the present or future. Not only this, but the topic itself provides valuable knowledge so that one might identify with past circumstances, and use them to their advantage. The past is, in the scope of things, not so very far away from the present. Though several ideas exist in the retaliation of crimes, the idea of policing is not so new. Napoleon Bonaparte said, "The act of policing is, in order to punish less often, to punish more severely. " And though policing in the United States does not involve judgment, the concept that the police protect our homes, our cities, our families, and our very self, is widely acknowledged, thus, making it a topic easily discussed by anyone. The Early Era of Policing spans from 1607 to 1840, and typically covers the time of American history in which police officers were not paid by cities, and were widely untaught and not knowledgeable. A prime example of Colonial policing regards the actions of a Captain John Smith (APVA, Figure 1). Smith brought a movement of martial law that held the small community together, making failure to comply with mandates oftentimes fatal. For example, failure to do ones job could mean starvation. Through his harsh martial law, the community came to thrive. Following the American Revolution, different forms of law-keeping bodies were developed, including the institution of the slave patrols. These groups of people would seek out escaped slaves, and bring them to their sort of justice. Lynch law, or the law of the mob, was also rampant, disavowing minorities and
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any sort of due process. In 1892, the following statistics (Wells) were reported to the Chicago Tribune regarding the number of individuals lynched in the States - Alabama. ........ 22 Montana. ......... 4 Arkansas. ....... 25 New York. ........ 1 California. ..... 3 North Carolina. .. 5 Florida. ........ 11 North Dakota. .... 1 Georgia. ........ 17
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This note was uploaded on 02/28/2011 for the course CRJ 110 taught by Professor Archer during the Spring '11 term at Ivy Tech Community College.

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Finalpaper - CRJ 110 Internet INTRODUCTION TO LAW...

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