lecture 16

lecture 16 - Control of movement From muscles to cortex...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Control of movement From muscles to cortex Part II - Upper control of movement
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Types of movements Reflex responses - knee jerk, withdrawal from pain, swallowing. Muscle contractions and relaxations that are rapid, stereotyped, involuntary and coordinated. Rhythmic motor patterns - walking, running, chewing. Typically initiation and termination are voluntary and triggered by peripheral stimuli. Voluntary movements - initiated movements to accomplish a specific goal (e.g. piano playing, writing). These are goal directed and largely learned movements that improve with practice, as one learns to anticipate and correct for environmental obstacles.
Background image of page 2
Organization of Neural Structures Involved in Motor Control Upper motor system Output system Execute movements Gating State of muscle contraction or relaxation Motor learning Lower motor system
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Upper motor control
Background image of page 4
Upper motor control Axons from the upper motor neurons descend to regulate the local circuits in the brainstem and spinal cord that organize movements. Upper motor pathways include several brainstem centers and a number of cortical areas in the frontal lobe. Brainstem centers are especially important for postural control. Motor and premotor cortex are responsible for the planning and precise control of complex sequences of voluntary movements.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Arrangement of motor neurons and local circuit interneurons within the spinal cord Medial ventral horn: MNs pools that innervate axial muscles and proximal limb muscles Lateral ventral horn: MNs that innervate distal limb muscles. Local circuit interneurons lie in the intermediate zone of the spinal cord grey matter.
Background image of page 6
Arrangement of motor neurons and local circuit interneurons within the spinal cord Medial intermediate zone local circuit neurons project to medial ventral horn MNs. Lateral regions of the intermediate zone contain local neurons that synapse with MNs in the lateral ventral horn. Medial local circuit neurons have axons
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 37

lecture 16 - Control of movement From muscles to cortex...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online