Lecture 23 - Lecture 23 CONSERVATIVE FORCES POTENTIAL &...

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Dynamics: Lecture Notes for Sections 14.5-14.6 1 Lecture 23 CONSERVATIVE FORCES POTENTIAL & KINETIC ENERGY CONSERVATION OF ENERGY Sections 14.5-14.6 Ehab Zalok 2 CONSERVATIVE FORCES AND POTENTIAL ENERGY AND CONSERVATION OF ENERGY Objectives: Students will be able to: 1. Understand the concept of conservative forces 2. Determine the potential energy of forces. 3. Apply the principle of conservation of energy.
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Dynamics: Lecture Notes for Sections 14.5-14.6 2 3 APPLICATIONS The weight of the sacks resting on this platform causes potential energy to be stored in the supporting springs. If the sacks weigh 100 lb and the equivalent spring constant is k = 500 lb/ft , what is the energy stored in the springs? 4 APPLICATIONS (continued) When a ball of weight W is dropped (from rest) from a height h above the ground, the potential energy stored in the ball is converted to kinetic energy as the ball drops. • What is the velocity of the ball when it hits the ground? • Does the weight of the ball affect the final velocity?
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Dynamics: Lecture Notes for Sections 14.5-14.6 3 5 CONSERVATIVE FORCE (Section 14.5) A force F is said to be conservative if the work done is
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This note was uploaded on 02/28/2011 for the course MATH 101 taught by Professor Duke during the Spring '11 term at University of Ottawa.

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Lecture 23 - Lecture 23 CONSERVATIVE FORCES POTENTIAL &...

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