Plagiarism Exercise 2

Plagiarism Exercise 2 - Nicholas Kulish, Author, 17, Says...

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Unformatted text preview: Nicholas Kulish, Author, 17, Says Its Mixing, Not Plagiarism, New York Times , Feb. 11, 2010 BERLIN It usually takes an author decades to win fawning reviews, march up the best-seller list and become a finalist for a major book prize. Helene Hegemann, just 17, did it with her first book, all in the space of a few weeks, and despite a savaging from critics over plagiarism. The publication last month of her novel about a 16-year-old exploring Berlins drug and club scene after the death of her mother, called Axolotl Roadkill, was heralded far and wide in German newspapers and magazines as a tremendous debut, particularly for such a young author. The book shot to No. 5 this week on the magazine Spiegels hardcover best-seller list. For the obviously gifted Ms. Hegemann, who already had a play (written and staged) and a movie (written, directed and released in theaters) to her credit, it was an early ascension to the ranks of artistic stardom. That is, until a blogger last week uncovered material in the novel taken from the less-well-known novel Strobo, by an author...
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Plagiarism Exercise 2 - Nicholas Kulish, Author, 17, Says...

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