S_P_to_post_F10

S_P_to_post_F10 - 10/4/10 Biology lecture: Immune System...

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10/4/10 1 Biology lecture: Immune System The immune system and the endocrine system are like the nervous system because: they are capable of responding to the environment they influence a wide variety of behaviors they have cells that communicate with one another. The Immune System Function: Monitor internal body for presence of foreign or harmful material and eliminate it Autoimmune disorders: immune system mistakes normal, healthy body cells as foreign and attacks them Interactions between Systems 4 lines of evidence point to the interaction between the immune, endocrine & nervous systems: Stress has a negative impact on the functioning of the immune system. Stress is an emotional & physiological response that interpreted by the nervous system. Immune responses can be learned; learning is a nervous system function. Stimulating or damaging certain parts of the nervous system (hypothalamus, brainstem, e.g.)can cause changes in immune system function. Immune system activity causes changes in neurotransmitter activity, hormonal secretion, and behavior.
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10/4/10 2 Introduction to Psychology Lecture 4: Sensation & Perception Sensation Lecture: Overview I. Introduction Sensation “vs.” Perception II. Sensation What do various sensation systems have in common? How is sensory information coded? III. Vision How do light, the eye, and the brain work together? IV. Other senses Sound, taste, smell, touch, and proprioception I. Introduction • Sensation “vs.” perception Basic principle: Lack of one-to-one correspondence between physical and psychological – Physical variables psychological variables – Sensation “and” perception
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10/4/10 3 I. Introduction Definitions Sense: A system that translates “outside” information into neural activity Sensation: Message from the senses Perception: Process by which sensations are given meaning I. Introduction What do S & P have in common? Active processes • Influenced by – current state – previous experience – expectations Demonstration: Stroop Effect I. Introduction What do S & P have in common? Adaptive processes • Binocular vision Demonstrations: Messing it up –Finger through single eye –Hot dog finger –Binocular suppression
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4 Sensation Lecture: Overview I. Introduction Sensation “vs.” Perception II. Sensation What do various sensation systems have in common? How is sensory information coded? III. Vision How do light, the eye, and the brain work? IV. Other senses Sound, taste, smell, touch, and propioception What do sensation systems have in common?
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S_P_to_post_F10 - 10/4/10 Biology lecture: Immune System...

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