Social+Influence+08+expanded+NOTES

Social+Influence+08+expanded+NOTES - 1 Social influence is...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 Social influence is the process whereby the presence, words or actions of other people directly or indirectly influence a persons behavior. 2 3 Conformity , changing behavior or beliefs to match those of other members of a group, occurs as a result of real or imagined, though unspoken , group pressure. Compliance occurs when people adjust their behavior because of a request . Explicit requests occur when someone asks you directly for something. Implicit requests occur when someone looks at you in a certain way to cue your behavior. 4 Solomon Asch conducted a classic experiment where subjects were asked to make unambiguous judgements, indicating which of three lines on a card matched an original standard. The task was easy, and 7 subjects were asked one at a time to make their judgements aloud. Only the 6th subject was a real subject, the others gave wrong answers Asch wanted to see how often people conformed, and gave an answer they knew was wrong, just because everyone else did. He found that on average, they conformed 37% of the time; however there was considerable variability among subjects (some never caved at all). 5 Subsequent studies using a similar protocol found that group size influences conformity, with larger groups increasing conformity. Follow-up studies also showed that group unanimity significantly influences conformity; if just one other person does not go along with the group (a dissenter), subjects are significantly less likely to conform. A recent analysis of Asch-like studies reveals less conformity in the U.S. since the 1950s but conformity is especially likely to occur in collectivist cultures. 6 In public conformity behavior is altered to fit the socially desirable thing to do, but beliefs or attitudes do not change. EXAMPLE: I have been invited to join a literary discussion group that includes my English teacher and the guy I am trying to get a date with. The book under discussion is one that I hated, but both my teacher and potential date loved it and rave about it at the meeting. I decide to say only positive things about the book to maintain the groups acceptance of me, but I do not change my original opinion of the book. In private acceptance people are convinced that their own perceptions were wrong and so they alter their beliefs and attitudes. EXAMPLE: I listen to what my teacher and potential date say about the book, decide to re- evaluate it, and actually change my mind and come to appreciate the book. Group norms are powerful because People are motivated to be correct and norms provide information about what is right and wrong. People are motivated to be liked by others and we generally like people who agree with us....
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Social+Influence+08+expanded+NOTES - 1 Social influence is...

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