Lecture_Note_Set_4_Slavery_in_the_Sudan

Lecture_Note_Set_4_Slavery_in_the_Sudan - Chapter 4 Slave...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 4 Slave Redemption in the Sudan Preparation. Review the chapter on demand and supply. If you wish, you can consult the Encyclopedia Britannica Online also for a very convenient compendium of information about the Republic of the Sudan, a country that for at least the past two centuries has been beset by warfare and other terrible difficulties. Motivation. What if somebody knocked on your door (this happened) and told you that people in the Republic of the Sudan are being sold into slavery, just like in the U.S. before the Civil War. They tell you of the horrors of enslavement in the Sudan. The person also tells you that the Sudanese market price for a human being is just U.S. $50. Think about that - for less than the price of a textbook you can own a person and do with him or her whatever you please. The person remarks that if you and three other people will each contribute the price of a medium-sized pizza then the money will be used to buy a person at a slave market and then the person will be set free. Would you hand over the requested donation, or not? Clearly this is a deeply emotional issue that provokes an immediate, angry response to the existence of such slavery. But set aside the emotion for now. Be logical. Think it through from the perspective of an economist. What would you do? Background Information. For centuries raiding parties have assaulted villagers in different parts of Africa, harvesting all but the very young and the elderly as slaves. In recent times in some places in Africa the market for slaves has revived. One such place is the Republic of the Sudan. Where is the Sudan? As Figure 4.1 1 shows, the Sudan is a large country in northeastern Africa. It is Africas largest country, occupying an area of 967,000 square miles or about 8% of the African continent. 1 Source: Encyclopedia Britannica Online 81 82 CHAPTER 4. SLAVE REDEMPTION Figure 4.1: Where Is The Republic Of The Sudan? Figure 4.2 2 is a map that displays the Sudan in more detail. The capital, Khar- toum, is located near to the center of the country at the junction of the Blue Nile and White Nile rivers. These tributaries combine to form the Nile River, which then flows north into Egypt. The country is essentially a huge central plain that is drained by the Nile Rivers and is bordered by plateaus in the west, south and east. The northern part of the plain is desert while the central and southern parts have infertile clay soils. 2 Source: Encyclopedia Britannica Online 83 Figure 4.2: A Map Of The Republic Of The Sudan. The northern and central parts of the Sudan are populated for the most part by Muslims, many of whom consider themselves to be Arabs because their common language is Arabic. The majority population of the southern Sudan is a collection of black peoples. Many of them follow traditional African religions while some are Christians. The Arabs comprise about 40% of the total population. The Dinka are the largest black group, making up about 12% of the total population. The remainingthe largest black group, making up about 12% of the total population....
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Lecture_Note_Set_4_Slavery_in_the_Sudan - Chapter 4 Slave...

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