HW_01_02_SOLN - difference is the type of histogram that is...

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Page 1 of 1 ECO220Y: Homework, Lectures 1 & 2 – SOLUTIONS (1) Many possible solutions. Cross-sectional: percent of regular faculty that are women in a sample of 34 economics departments in universities around the world in 2004. Time series: percent of regular faculty that are women at the University of Toronto Department of Economics from 1984 – 2004. Longitudinal (panel): percent of regular faculty that are women in a sample of 34 economics departments in universities around the world from 1984 – 2004. (2) (a) 100*(5 + 1)/78 = 7.7% (b) 100*(0.06 + 0.015) = 7.5% (approximate because we roughly estimate the height) (c) 100*(2*0.035 + 2*0.005) = 8.0% (approximate because we roughly estimate the height) (d) As we discussed in lecture, the underlying data in this example are the same and the only
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Unformatted text preview: difference is the type of histogram that is used. Of course the percent that work 12 hours or more does not change depending on the type of histogram. Any differences in our answers above are simply because we had to visually approximate using the graphs. (In this case because employees must be integers we can be confident in the exactness of our calculation in Part (a) .) (3) Write up your own explanation using the idea of sampling error. (Recall the M&M’s experiment in class: the same concept applies here. Instead of M&M’s, we have employees. Instead of colors, we have hours of work.) (4) nominal (categories of water bodies), interval (measures time), ordinal (ranking; you might say nominal but there is a clear ranking of the categories)...
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