7 Stratification.ppt

7 Stratification.ppt - Social Stratification unequal...

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Unformatted text preview: Social Stratification unequal distribution of social rewards Social Stratification We now turn to the topic of stratification. We will begin by covering how it is created by culture and social institutions. We will consider the different forms it takes in different societies. Then we will take a closer look at stratification in the U.S., particularly based on social class. In subsequent weeks we will look at stratification by race/ethnicity, gender, and eventually nation-states. SOCIAL STRATIFICATION SOCIAL STRATIFICATION systematic division of people into categories that are ranked on a scale of social worth universal process All societies have stratification, but amount varies. social construction Does NOT reflect objective difference in value between people. structure of stratification is particular to each society Categories used to rank people reflect the broader cultural ideologies, beliefs, values, norms, institutions. Ideologies justify the existence of stratification. persists over generations reproduces inequality Max Weber: There are 3 components to inequality. Social Power Social Power ability to make people do what you want Class Class wealth & income Status Status prestige Davis-Moore answer: Stratification benefits society. It is functional . . people have needs--some are highly specialized such as health care, justice, entertainment Some social positions such as being a physician, judge, pro athlete, or opera singer take more effort, time, and special abilities to achieve and/or the work is more demanding than most jobs Greater rewards are needed to motivate the best-qualified to put in the time and effort to develop their special abilities to fill these social positions Rewards include: income, prestige, power Does everyone have the same opportunities to develop their special abilities? Are all of the rich worth to society what they earn? Why Are Societies Stratified? No, peoples social characteristics influence both their opportunities and rewards to a greater or lesser extent, depending on the system of stratification in a society. Social Status Categories Social Status Categories Used for Stratification Used for Stratification Ascribed Ascribed involuntary positions Skin color Race/ethnicity Sex Age National origin Achieved Achieved voluntary positions Education Occupation Income Marital status Stratification Systems Stratification Systems Two extremes on a continuum of Two extremes on a continuum of stratification systems: stratification systems: Caste Systems Caste Systems Class Systems Class Systems Difference between the two is the role Difference between the two is the role of involuntary ascribed characteristics of involuntary ascribed characteristics Stratification is based on ascribed statuses....
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This note was uploaded on 03/01/2011 for the course SOC 101 taught by Professor Sullivan during the Spring '08 term at ASU.

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7 Stratification.ppt - Social Stratification unequal...

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