10 Family.ppt

10 Family.ppt - Family is a core social institution •...

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Unformatted text preview: Family is a core social institution • unites individuals into cooperative groups that provide physical & emotional support to members, especially to dependents – Saw family’s role in children’s socialization & the transfer of “social capital” • Structure & function of families vary by society – in some societies families have multiple wives; a few have multiple husbands – in some societies families are units of production; in others they are units of consumption Family is a core social institution • Structure & function of families change over time as other social institutions change – Family is intertwined with other social institutions such as religion, education, economy, government, etc. • e.g. Govt. dictates who we can marry and if/how we get unmarried, how we can parent, & legal implications of family relationships • Fertility declines when women work in the paid labor force • Sociologists are interested in how changes in culture & social institutions affect families and how families in turn affect people’s social experiences in life. – Any system of inequality affects families, whether it is based on gender, race, age, religion, etc. Definition of the Family – Primary group--usually related by ancestry, marriage, cohabitation, or adoption – Cooperative economic unit – Emotional and physical care of young and each other – Identities of individuals are attached to the group – Members are committed to maintaining the group Functions of the Family – Regulation of sexual activity • Incest taboos • Maintenance of kinship order and property rights – Reproduction of society – Socialization of members • Creating well-integrated members of society – Confers social status • Social placement/stratification – Support system • Material & emotional support • Haven for people Social Capital Social capital = advantage created by a person’s social position. Kinship Systems – Social networks – Connected by bonds of blood, marriage, adoption – Join individuals into families of: • Orientation--childhood family • Procreation--adult family formed by marriage Decreased Fertility Changes the Kin Structure 4 births per woman 2 births per woman With 4 births per woman the kin structure goes from 1 woman in one generation to 2 women in the next generation to 4 women in the next generation to 8 women in the next generation to 16 one in the next generation to 32 in the next etc. With 2 birth per woman the number of women in each generation of the family stays constant--one. Kinship System determines: – inheritance – power and property rights – characteristics of partners (definition of incest) – # of partners – place of residence – order of succession in monarchies Descent system of tracking kinship, property rights, inheritance, titles • Unilineal-- ancestry determined by only one side – Patrilineal-- belong to father’s decent group – Matrilineal-- belong to mother’s decent...
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This note was uploaded on 03/01/2011 for the course SOC 101 taught by Professor Sullivan during the Spring '08 term at ASU.

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10 Family.ppt - Family is a core social institution •...

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