L08.PZ3 - INM 313: Inclusive Design Lecture 3: Web...

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1 INM 313: Inclusive Design Lecture 3: Web Accessibility Slide 2 Lecture 3 Overview Jargons W3C WAI WCAG WCAG Conformance Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) How do People with Special Needs Access the Web? Web Accessibility Evaluation The DRC Study
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2 Slide 3 Jargons ATAG: Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines – For developers of: • Editing tools specifically designed to produce Web content (e.g., WYSIWYG • Tools that offer the option of saving content in a Web format (e.g., Word) • Tools that transform documents into Web formats • Tools that produce multimedia, especially when it’s intended for the Web • Tools for site management or site publication • Tools for management of layout (CSS tool) UAAG: User Agent Accessibility Guidelines – For developers of Web browsers, media players, assistive technologies, and other user agents Slide 4 W3C WAI WCAG World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) – Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI)’s Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG): www.w3c.org/WAI. Now v. 1.0. Version 2.0 is coming out soon. Most widely used, many policies from various countries refer to WCAG. Themes of Accessible Design: – Graceful Transformation (“Until user agents can do ….”) – Making Content understandable and navigable
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3 Slide 5 Accessibility : The Bigger Picture Slide 6 Limitations of the Model This model: – Requires all three components to be implemented in order for the WAI vision to be achieved – Is of limited use to end users who have no control over browser or authoring tools developments – Is confusing – as many think WCAG is WAI How does this model address: – Delays in full conformance? (We're still waiting for " until user agents … " clause to be resolved) – Real-world reluctance to deploy new software (issues of inertia, testing, costs, …) – Real world complexities
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4 Slide 7 W3C WAI WCAG WCAG contains 14 guidelines. Each has: The guideline number and statement. The rationale behind the guideline and some groups of users who benefit from it. Checkpoints specific enough for verification and assignment of a priority based on its impact on accessibility. Priority One Must be followed or it is impossible for 1 or more groups to access info in the doc (A-level compliance). Priority Two Should be followed. Satisfying it will remove significant barriers for 1 or more groups (AA-level). Priority Three May be addressed. Satisfying it will improve access (AAA- level). Slide 8 WCAG Conformance Surveys using automated tools (which gives upper limit on accessibility) – DRC (Disability Rights Commission) report: 19% A, 0.6% AA conformance based on 1,000 Web sites – UK Museums report: 42% A, 3% AA conformance based on 124 Web sites – UK Universities surveys (2002, 04): 43%/58% A, 2%/6% AA based on 160+ Web sites These low conformance levels can indicate: – Organisations don't care – Guidelines are difficult to implement – Guidelines are inappropriate, misleading, wrong
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This note was uploaded on 03/01/2011 for the course 1MD 001 taught by Professor Erikborälv during the Spring '09 term at Uppsala.

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L08.PZ3 - INM 313: Inclusive Design Lecture 3: Web...

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