CHEM2090-LAB-2010 - CHEMISTRY 2090 LABORATORY POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Fall 2010 Cornell University Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology

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CHEMISTRY 2090 LABORATORY POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Fall 2010 Cornell University Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology
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ii LABORATORY PROGRAM A. Laboratory Overview During the laboratory component of this course you will learn the following: 1. Competence in the use of chemical laboratory equipment and the application of general laboratory techniques First and foremost, this is a course in chemistry. It is not surprising then that through this course you will develop an understanding of and competence with a number of laboratory techniques used in chemistry. Examples include titrations, crystallizations, and the rudiments of spectroscopy. You will also become skilled at using the equipment common to the chemistry laboratory: burets, pipets, flasks, graduated cylinders, and more. While of obvious value to those students who go on to become professional chemists, even students who intend to become professionals in the sciences and engineering benefit from this training: many of the laboratory techniques and pieces of equipment you learn about here are utilized in other scientific disciplines as well. 2. How to apply the important chemical concepts presented in the lecture The laboratory experiments in this course have been chosen to be as representative of the major topics presented in lecture as possible. These experiments will deepen and strengthen your understanding of the concepts you will be tested upon in lecture. Wherever possible, the experiment topics have been chosen to illustrate how chemists apply the ideas you learn about in lecture. 3. Group work skills One of the basic skills employers want prospective employees to learn as part of their education is the ability to work effectively in a group setting. Moreover, educational research has found that student satisfaction and learning is increased when student learning is engaged in cooperatively. During most of the experiments in this course, you will work as a member of a group. In those experiments performed individually, you are strongly encouraged ask your peers for help and advice. 4. Order, present, and assess data The difference between the clear ordering and presentation of data and its converse is often the difference between understanding and misunderstanding. An understandable reporting of experimental results is an essential component of work in all of the sciences. You may be a scientific genius and someday perform Nobel Prize worthy work, but if you lack the ability to write an understandable, cogent sentence no one is likely to know it (or reward it). A special emphasis will be placed in this course upon presenting data in tables and graphs, two of the most common and useful methods of presenting data in science.
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This note was uploaded on 03/01/2011 for the course CHEM 2090 taught by Professor Zax,d during the Winter '07 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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CHEM2090-LAB-2010 - CHEMISTRY 2090 LABORATORY POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Fall 2010 Cornell University Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology

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