{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

L14.p1 - National Research Council Canada Institute for...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
National Research Council Canada Institute for Information Technology Conseil national de recherches Canada Institut de technologie de l'information Exploring the Gender Divide on YouTube: An Analysis of the Creation and Reception of Vlogs * Molyneaux, H., O’Donnell, S., Gibson, K., Singer, J. June 2008 * published in the American Communication Journal. Volume 10, Number 2. Summer 2008. NRC 50360. Copyright 2008 by National Research Council of Canada Permission is granted to quote short excerpts and to reproduce figures and tables from this report, provided that the source of such material is fully acknowledged.
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 American Communication Journal Vol. 10, No. 2 , Summer 2008 Exploring the Gender Divide on YouTube: An Analysis of the Creation and Reception of Vlogs Heather Molyneaux, Susan O’Donnell, Kerri Gibson and Janice Singer Keywords : YouTube, vlog, internet, user, content, visual, reception, production, audience, gender, video This study analyzes short vlogs posted to YouTube in order to investigate how women and men communicate using vlogs and react as viewers to vlogs. Vlogs are visual texts that are user- generated. Analyzing online videos presents a new challenge for researchers: traditionally, analysis of visual media and communication focused on either the production or the reception of the material. Our vlog study uses a dual analytical approach to analyze both production and reception, while conducting content, visual and audience analysis, thus making a contribution to the field of new visual media and communication. ______________________________________________________________________________ Heather Molyneaux is an analyst in the People-Centred Technologies group at the National Research Council Institute for Information Technology. Correspondence to: NRC Institute for Information Technology, 46 Dineen Drive, Fredericton, NB, Canada E3B 9W4. Email: [email protected] Susan O’Donnell, PhD is a senior researcher at the National Research Council Institute for Information Technology and an Adjunct Professor in Sociology at the University of New Brunswick. Email: [email protected] .Kerri Gibson is an analyst at the National Research Council Institute for Information Technology and a PhD student in Clinical Psychology at the University of New Brunswick. Email [email protected] Janice Singer, PhD is a senior researcher at the National Research Council Institute for Information Technology. Email: [email protected]
Image of page 2
2 Producing and sharing user-generated video, known as "video blogging," has recently become popular with millions of people. Video blogs, also known as "vlogs," are blogs created in video rather than textual form. Vlogs are a form of online publishing, allowing everyone with web access and simple video production tools – such as a computer and a webcam or a cell phone with video capabilities – to create and post content. Most vlogs are authored by individuals and focus on personal themes (Nardi, 2004; Schiano, 2004). Like blogs, vlogs are a user-generated form of online communication that serve as media for social commentary, alternative newscasts, creative outlets or personal online diaries. We chose YouTube as an
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern